Diễn đàn Paltalk TiengNoi TuDo Cua NguoiDan VietNam

April 26, 2008

CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY: PARTNER, REGIONAL POWER, OR GREAT POWER RIVAL?

Le rôle de la Chine en grande stratégie américaine:
PARTNER, REGIONAL POWER, OR GREAT POWER

Partenaire, puissance régionale, ou de grande puissance RIVAL? RIVAL?
C C
HRISTOPHER HRISTOPHER
L L
AYNE AYNE
In the American foreign and defense policy communities the conventionalwisdom now holds that China will emerge as a true great power in the twenty-first century’s early decades. As one commentator has argued, ‘Whenhistorians one hundred years hence write about our time, they may wellconclude that the most significant development was the emergence of avigorous market economy—and army—in the most populous country in the world’.1It is unsurprising, therefore, that since the early 1990s, Americanpolicymakers and analysts have focused increasingly on the strategic implications of China’s rise to great-power status. The conventional wisdom holds that American thinking about China falls into two competing viewpoints. One school of thought—widespread in the Bush II administration, especially the Pentagon—views China as an increasingly salient threat to US interests in East Asia, and America’s most likely future great power (or ‘peer competitor’) rival. Viewing China as already a strategic competitor, adherents of this viewpoint hold that Washington therefore must ‘contain’ China. Containment is primarily a geostrategic policythat would use American military power to rein in China’s ambitions and compel Beijing to adhere to Washington’s rules of the game on such issues as arms control, weapons proliferation, trade, and human rights. For some, containment means using US influence to compel Beijing to accede to the liberalization of China’s domestic political system.The other school of thought—with which the Clinton administration wasidentified—holds that by ‘engaging’ Beijing (and by enmeshing it in the global economy and various multilateral institutional frameworks) China’s rise to great-power status can be managed, and Beijing can be induced to behave 1Nicholas Kristof, ‘The Rise of China,’ Foreign Affairs 72 (November/December 1993), p.59.

Not all analysts agree that China will emerge as a peer competitor. For a summary of thedebate, see Thomas J. Christensen, ‘Posing Problems without Catching Up: China’s Rise andChallenges for US Security Policy,’ International Security, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Spring 2001), pp.5-9. 54
——————————————————————————–
Page 2
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

55‘responsibly’ in international politics. Engagement is predicated on the beliefthat, as China’s contacts with the outside world multiply, its exposure to ‘Western’ (that is, American) political and cultural values will result in evolutionary political change within China. Thus, containment is a strategy that gives more emphasis to the traditional ‘hard power’ tools of statecraft (especially military power), while engagement places somewhat more weight on the ‘soft power’ of ideas and trade.2Containment holds that China must transform its domestic system ‘or else.’ Engagement holds that, over time, China will change. Containment stresses the exercise of American power. Engagement stresses the benefits to China of cooperating with the international community.This chapter discusses the role of China in American grand strategy. When all is said and done, it is apparent that there is a mainstream consensus viewabout the future of the Sino-American relationship, and that within this consensus the differences between containers and engagers are of degree, not of kind. US policymakers and foreign policy analysts broadly agree that China’s emergence as a great power would threaten America’s post-Cold Warhegemony. The debate in policy circles is not about whether China’s great-power emergence is inimical to American interests, but rather, what Washington should do about it. This chapter will first discuss American grand strategy and its theoretical underpinnings. Second, it will address the issue of whether China, indeed, is likely to emerge as a great power. Third, building on insights from international relations (IR) theory, it will show why strategic rivalry between the US and China is highly likely to occur. The chapterconcludes with a prescription for an optimal US grand strategic posture toward a rising China.THE INFLUENCE OF THEORY ON GRAND STRATEGY The debate about America’s China policy focuses primarily on several salient issues. Is China becoming a great power and, if so, will it threaten American interests? If China is becoming a great power, can its great poweremergence be managed? Will China’s growing ties to the global economy make Beijing more pliable? Will China become more democratic (and howmuch should the United States do to promote democracy in China)? From the standpoint of American security, does it make a difference whether China is democratic? The present debate about China’s role in American grand strategy 2The distinction between hard and soft power is set forth in Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power (New York: Basic Books, 1991).
——————————————————————————–
Page 3
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY

56

addresses these questions. This debate, however, cannot be understood properly without venturing into the seemingly treacherous waters of international relations theory. I say this hesitantly. Anyone who has taught the subject knows that the mere mention of the words ‘international relations theory’ is likely to cause the audience’s eyes to glaze over.’ But this is not an exercise in discussing theory for theory’s sake. On the contrary, policy debates inescapably have a theoretical dimension.3The nexus between theory and policy is especially important with respect to grand strategy. After all, the very concept of grand strategy posits a relationship between theory and policy. As Posen puts it,grand strategy is a state’s theory about how it best can cause security for itself.4In making grand strategy, policymakers build on their assumptions about how the world works; that is, their models (even if only implicit) of international politics. Grand strategy is a set of cause-and-effect hypotheses postulatingwhich policies are most likely to produce the strategic outcomes that policymakers desire. The success of a state’s grand strategy depends, therefore, ‘on whether the hypotheses [that policymakers] embrace are correct.’5Hence, to evaluate a grand strategy, it is necessary understand the theoretical model(s) that underlies it. The China policy debate illustrates concretely how theory influences policy. Realist Foundations Of American Grand Strategy What scholars call realism is what most people think of when they hear the term ‘power politics.’ Realism’s fundamental insight is that international politics is different from domestic politics. This is because, unlike domestic politics, in international relations there is no central authority (that is, a government) that can make and enforce rules of conduct on the system’s participants. When realists talk about international politics being anarchic, they are referring to this lack of a governing authority. When they talk about international politics as a ‘self-help’ system, they simply mean that in a 3As Stephen Van Evera observes, important policy questions usually do: ‘It is often said that policy-prescriptive work is not theoretical. The opposite is true. All policy proposals rest onforecasts about the effects of policies. These forecasts rest in turn on implicit or explicit theoretical assumptions about the laws of social and political motion. Hence all evaluation ofpublic policy requires the framing, and evaluation of theory, hence it is fundamentally theoretical.’ Stephen Van Evera, Guide to Methods for Students of Political Science (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997), p.91. 4Barry Posen, The Sources of Military Doctrine: France, Britain, and Germany Between the World Wars (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1984), p.13. 5Stephen M. Walt, The Origins of Alliances (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1987), p.2.
——————————————————————————–
Page 4
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

57

condition of anarchy, each state is responsible for ensuring its own survival and well-being. Of course, when a state acts to protect itself, its actions may have the paradoxical consequence of causing other states to feel that their security is impaired by the first state’s behavior. The result is often the kind of spiral that we associate with arms races. This vicious circle, where the quest for security leads to increased insecurity, is what international relations theorists call the ‘security dilemma’.6The security dilemma explains a lot about both Beijing’s, and Washington’s, perceptions of the Sino-American relationship. Offensive realism lies at the core of American grand strategy.7Itincorporates the following key assumptions about the nature of internationalpolitics. First, security in the international political system is scarce.8Second, although all realists believe international politics is competitive, offensive realists (unlike defensive realists) believe that international politics is ineluctably conflictive—a harsh, unrelenting competition—because there are no offsetting factors tempering the great powers’ struggle for power andsecurity. Third, pervasive insecurity means that international politicsapproximates a zero-sum game—that is, a gain in relative power for one state is a loss of relative power for all the others, which means there isn’t a whole lot of room for great-power cooperation.9Fourth, in this hothouse environment,states are impelled to pursue offensive strategies by maximizing their powerand influence at their rivals’ expense.Given the fact that, for great powers, international politics is a harsh, unrelenting struggle for survival, what grand strategy is prescribed by offensive realism? Simply put, offensive realists say great powers should maximize their power in order to attain security. As University of Chicago political scientist John J. Mearsheimer says, ‘states quickly understand that the best way to ensure their survival is to be the most powerful state in the system.’106On the security dilemma, see John Herz, Political Realism and Political Idealism (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951), p.24. Also, see Robert Jervis, ‘Cooperation Under the Security Dilemma,’ World Politics, Vol. 30, No. 2 (January 1978), pp.167-214. 7Key works on offensive realism include, John J. Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics (New York: W.W. Norton, 2001); Fareed Zakaria, From Wealth to Power: The Unusual Origins of America’s World Role (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998); Eric J. Labs, ‘Offensive Realism and Why States Expand Their Security Aims,’ Security Studies, Vol. 6, No. 4 (Summer 1997); Christopher Layne, ‘The ‘Poster Child for Offensive Realism:’ America as Global Hegemon,’ Security Studies. Vol12. No. 2 (Fall 2003). 8Mearsheimer, pp.7-13; Zakaria, op.cit., p.13; Labs, op.cit., pp.1, 7-8. 9Mearsheimer, pp.12-13; Zakaria, op.cit., pp.29-30; Labs, op.cit., p.11. 10Mearsheimer, p.33. Also, see Tellis, Drive to Domination, pp.376-379, 381-382.
——————————————————————————–
Page 5
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY5

8

Offensive realists believe that because of the international system’s structure, states can never settle for having ‘just enough’ power, because it is impossiblefor a state to know how much power really is sufficient to ensure its security.For great powers, the way to break out of the ‘security dilemma’ is to eliminate the competition, and become a hegemon. As offensive realists view things, ‘the pursuit of power stops only when hegemony is achieved,’ because for great powers ‘the best way to ensure their security is to achieve hegemony now, thus eliminating any possibility of a challenge by another great power’.11Liberal Influences On American Grand Strategy Although US grand strategy is shaped fundamentally by offensive realism, it also has an important component that is drawn from the liberal approach toIR theory (also known as Wilsonianism, or liberal internationalism). This is because American grand strategy is, as former Secretary of State James A. Baker III has put it, ‘a complex mixture of political idealism and realism’.12Or, as the Bush II administration’s 2002 National Security Strategy of the United States puts it, US grand strategy is ‘based on a distinctly American internationalism that reflects the union of our values and our national interests’.13America’s hegemonic grand strategy, in fact, is a ‘realpolitik plus’ grand strategy—a grand strategy that defines US national interests in terms both of power and the promotion of US ideals—which is why it has been labeled as ‘liberal realism’, or ‘national interest liberalism’.14In American grand strategy, liberalism is muscular, not ‘idealistic’, nd it postulates cause-and-effect linkages about how the United States can enhance its security. In making the case to incorporate liberal objectives into US grand strategy, liberals talk the language of realism. The liberal and realist impulses in American grand strategy cannot bedisentangled neatly from each other because there is a circular logic that tiesthem together. A liberal world order is thought to be conducive to US interests, and to bolster America’s power and security; therefore, because the United States is very powerful in international politics, it should use its power to create a liberal world order so that it can obtain more security for itself. In 11Mearsheimer, pp.34, 35. 12James A. Baker, III, The Politics of Diplomacy: Revolution, War and Peace, 1989-1982 (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1995), p.654. 13Unites States Government, The National Security Strategy of the United States of America(Washington D.C., September 2002), p.1.14The term ‘realpolitik plus’ is Robert Art’s. See Robert J. Art, ‘Geopolitics Updated: The Strategy of Selective Engagement,’ International Security, Vol. 23, No. 3, p.80. The terms ‘liberal realism,’ and ‘national interest liberalism,’ are used, respectively by David Stiegerwald, Wilsonian Idealism in America (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994) and Tony Smith, ‘Making the World Safe for Democracy,’ Diplomatic History, Vol. 23, No. 2 (Spring 1999), p.183.
——————————————————————————–
Page 6
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE5

9

fact, offensive realism leads precisely to the expectation that a hegemonic great power will use its preponderance to increase both its hard and soft power, and will view the two as mutually reinforcing.What is the liberal approach to IR theory, and what are its key contentions? There are three main strands to liberal thought about international politics: political liberalism (also known as democratic peace theory), commercial liberalism, and liberal institutionalism. Political liberalism’s central claim—and liberals are all over the ballpark here—is that liberal (or democratic) states do not (or seldom) fight each other, and do not (or seldom) use military threats in their relations with one another. Political liberalism also tracks with balance of threat theory by suggesting that other liberal states will not balance against a powerful (even hegemonic) liberal state,because they know it will not use its capabilities to harm them.15Commercialliberalism (which today essentially is synonymous with the concepts of international economic interdependence, and ‘globalization’) holds that international commerce and interdependence lead to peace, or at least make war much less likely.16Commercial liberalism’s key claims have been neatly summarized by Arthur Stein:War is costly, and exchange is beneficial. The prospects ofcommerce increase the costs associated with war, and the development of commerce creates a constituency to press the casefor peace. As governments become more representative, the greaterthe degree to which those costs come to be included in political calculations and decisions and to be reflected in the politicalsystem.

17Liberal institutionalism holds that international institutions or regimes facilitate mutually advantageous cooperation that only can be attained when states voluntarily forego unilateral action in favor of multilateral collaboration.Thus, it is said, institutions temper the effects of anarchy in both economic 15As Michael Doyle says, ‘balancing denigrates the pacific union [among liberal democracies] and thus should be eschewed by liberals in their relations with each other.’ Doyle, ‘Politics and Grand Strategy,’ p.35. 16For an overview, see Stein, ‘Economic Interdependence and International Cooperation,’ pp.244-254. Stein concludes (p.290) that although economic exchange and interdependence do not ensure peace, they do make war less likely. The seminal work on interdependence is Robert O. Keohane and Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Power and Interdependence (Boston: Little, Brown, 2ed., 1989). 17Stein, ‘Economic Interdependence and International Cooperation,’ p.255. For a recent argument that democracy, free trade, and international economic interdependence are interrelated see Tony Smith, America’s Mission: The United States and the Worldwide Struggle for Democracy in the Twentieth Century (New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1995), pp.327-329.
——————————————————————————–
Page 7
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY

60

and security relations among states. As Robert Axelrod and Robert O. Keohane argue, ‘Even in a world of independent states that are jealously guarding their sovereignty, room exists for new and better arrangements to achieve mutually satisfactory outcomes, in both terms of economic welfare and military security’.18Liberalism’s bottom line is that it posits the existence of a virtuous circle among democracy, an open international economy, andinternational institutions. America’s Hegemonic Grand Strategy By eliminating America’s only great power rival, the Soviet Union’s collapse vaulted the United States into a position of uncontested global hegemony. Since the Cold War’s end, the declared objective of US grand strategy has been to consolidate and extend American hegemony in the international system. This first became clear in March 1992, when the initial draft of the Pentagon’s Defense Planning Guidance (DPG) for Fiscal Years 1994-1999 was leaked to the New York Times.19The DPG made clear that the objective of US grand strategy henceforth would be to maintain America’s preponderance by preventing the emergence of new great-power rivals. As the DPG stated, ‘we must maintain the mechanisms for deterring potential competitors from even aspiring to a larger regional or global role’.20This strategy aimed not only at thwarting the emergence of the ‘usual suspects’ (a rising China, or a resurgent Russia), but also the rise to great-power status of America’s principal Cold War allies, Germany and Japan. As the DPG said, ‘We must account sufficiently for the interests of the large industrial nations to discourage them from challenging our leadership or seeking to overturn the established political oreconomic order’.2118Robert Axelrod and Robert O. Keohane, ‘Achieving Cooperation Under Anarchy’, David A. Baldwin ed., Neorealism and Neoliberalism: The Contemporary Debate (New York: Columbia University Press, 1993), p.113. This claim also is made in Robert O. Keohane and Lisa Martin, ‘The Promise of Institutional Theory,’, Michael Brown et al eds., Theories of War and Peace(Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998), pp.390-391. According to Keohane, states do not worry, per se, about the asymmetric distribution of gains from cooperation. Concern about relative gains arises only where there is a probability (not merely a possibility) that another will use its relative gains in a way that adversely affect’s the state’s interests. Where cooperation is institutionalized, the probability of asymmetric gains being so used is low. See also Robert O. Keohane, ‘Institutionalist Theory and the Realist Challenge,’ in David Baldwin op.cit. pp.275-277, 281-283. 19Patrick E. Tyler, ‘US Strategy Plan Calls for Insuring No Rivals Develop,’ New York Times, 8March 1992, p.A1. 20‘Excerpts From Pentagon’s Plan: ‘Prevent the Re-emergence of a New Rival’,’ New York Times, 8 March 1992, p.A14 (emphasis added). 21Ibid.
——————————————————————————–
Page 8
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE61

aim by maintaining overwhelming military superiority so that it ‘can dissuade other countries from initiating future military competitions’ against the US, and, if necessary, ‘impose the will of the United States… on any adversaries.’26The 2002 National Security Strategy states even more clearly that the objective ofAmerican strategy is to prevent any other state from building up military capabilities in the hope of ‘surpassing, or even equaling, the power of the United States’. In a break with the Bush I and Clinton administrations, however, the Bush II administration has incorporated the logic of ‘anticipatory violence’into US grand strategy.27The 2002 National Security Strategy, and policy statements by senior administration officials (including President George W. Bush himself) have reserved to Washington the right to act preemptively, or preventively to cut down potential rivals before they become actual ones.28China’s emergence as a great power would challenge directly America’sglobal hegemony. American grand strategy clearly aims to hold down China.While acknowledging that China is a regional power, Washington conspicuously does not concede that China either is, or legitimately can aspire to be, a great power.29Discreetly warning China against challenging the United States militarily, the 2002 National Security Strategy warns Beijing that, ‘In pursuing advanced military capabilities that can threaten its neighbors in the Asia-Pacific region, China is following an outdated path that, in the end, will hamper its own pursuit of national greatness. In time, China will find that social and 26Ibid., pp.12-13, 15. 27It is perhaps more accurate to say that the Bush II administration, unlike its predecessors, openly incorporated preemption and preventive war into US grand strategy. The Clinton administration did prepare to launch a preemptive strike again North Korea during the 1994crisis caused by discovery Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons program. See Ashton B. Carter and William J. Perry, ‘Back to the Brink,’ Washington Post, October, 20, 2002, p.B1. To the extent the Bush I administration’s policy, in fact, was driven by concerns about Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s push to acquire nuclear weapons, and other WMD capabilities, the 1991 Persian Gulf War could be regarded as a preventive war. 28George W. Bush, ‘Remarks by the President at 2002 Graduation Exercise of the United States Military Academy’, West Point, N.Y., June 1, 2002, http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2002/06print/20020601-3.html.The Bush II administration’s National Security Strategy (op.cit. p.15) declares that: ‘The United States has long maintained the option of preemptive actions to counter a sufficient threat to our national security. The greater the threat, the greater the is the risk of inaction – and the more compelling the case for taking anticipatory action to defend ourselves, even if uncertainty remains as to the time and place of the enemy’s attack. To forestall or prevent such hostile acts by our adversaries, the United States will, if necessary, act preemptively.’ 29For example, Defense Secretary William Cohen described China as an Asian power.William Cohen, ‘Annual Bernard Brodie Lecture,’ University of California, Los Angeles, October 28, 1998 (DoD web site).
——————————————————————————–
Page 10
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

63

political freedom is the only source of that greatness’.30Notwithstanding Beijing’s views to the contrary, the US grand strategy rejects the notion that China has any justifiable basis for regarding the American military presence in East Asia as threatening to its interests.31Washington aims to encourage China to become a ‘responsible member of the international community’.32‘Responsibility’, however, is defined as Beijing’s willingness to accept Washington’s vision of a stable international order.33It also means China’s domestic political liberalization, and its development as a free-market economy firmly anchored to the international economy. As the Bush II administration’s 2002 National Security Strategy declares, ‘America will encourage the advancement of democracy and economic openness’ in China, ‘because these are the best foundations for domestic stability and international order’.34In essence, then, American grand strategy requires China to accept UShegemony. The strategy is silent, however, on what the US will do if Beijing refuses to accept America’s pre-eminence. On this point—notwithstanding that its emphasis on the pre-emptive and preventive use of military power has been debated mostly within the context of the US response to terrorist groups like al-Qaida and rogue states like Saddam Hussein’s Iraq—the Bush II administration’s strategy has obvious implications for potential peercompetitors such as China.WILL CHINA RISE? The Fates of Hegemons American grand strategists believe, to paraphrase the Duchess of Windsor, that the US can never be too rich, too powerful, or too well armed. And, at first blush, the natural reaction is to ask, ‘what’s wrong with that?’ After all, if international politics is about power—and it is—then should not the United States seek to amass as much power as possible? Yet, although it may seem counter-intuitive, there is plenty of evidence that suggests that it is self-30National Security Strategy, op.cit., p.27 31Department of Defense, The United States Security Strategy for the East-Asia Pacific Region 1998 (Washington D.C., 1998 ) p.30 . 32Ibid.33Clinton, ‘Remarks on US-China Relations;’ Cohen, ‘Annual Bernard Brodie Lecture;’ TheUnited States Security Strategy for the East-Asia Pacific Region 1998. As National Security Adviser Berger puts it: ‘Our interest lies in protecting our security while encouraging China to make the right choices’—especially choosing to allocate its resources to internal development rather than building up its military power. Berger, ‘American Power.’ 34National Security Strategy, op.cit.
——————————————————————————–
Page 11
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY

64

defeating for a great power to become too powerful. Since the beginnings of the modern international system, there have been successive bids for hegemony: by the Habsburg Empire under Charles V, Spain under Philip II,France under Louis XIV and Napoleon, and Germany under Hitler (and, some historians would argue—though the point is contested—under Wilhelm II). Each of these hegemonic aspirants in turn was defeated by a counter-balancing coalition of states that feared the consequences for their security if a hegemonic aspirant succeeded in establishing its predominance over the international system. ‘Hegemonic empires,’ Henry Kissinger has observed, ‘almost automatically elicit universal resistance, which is why all such claimantssooner or later exhausted themselves’.35It is a pretty safe bet that the United States will not be able to escape the fates of previous contenders for hegemony. Consistent with the historicalrecord, we should expect to see American power balanced either by the emergence of new great powers, and/or the formation of counter-hegemonic alliances directed against the United States.36For balancing to occur, ofcourse, there must be other actors in the international system able to match US military, economic, and technological capabilities. To date, however, no rivalto the US has emerged. And some US grand strategists believe no challenger will emerge in the future, because America’s economic and technological lead over potential great-power rivals is insurmountable.37Indeed, given the immense imbalance of power in America’s favor, ‘catching up is difficult.’38Clearly, in the short-term (the next decade) no state will emerge as America’s geopolitical peer. But over the next several decades one or more peer competitors is bound to emerge. This is where China comes into the equation. Why New Great Powers Rise: The Imperatives of China’s Emergence Great-power emergence results from the interlocking effects of differential growth rates, anarchy, and balancing. The process of great-power emergence is much more straightforward than this terminology might seem to imply. The term ‘differential growth rates’ is the specialist’s way of stating an important fact: the economic (and technological and military) power of states grows at 35Henry A. Kissinger, ‘The Long Shadow of Vietnam,’ Newsweek, May 1, 2000, p.50. 36For a detailed explanation of the theoretical and empirical foundations of this argument, see Christopher Layne, ‘The Unipolar Illusion. Why New Great Powers Will Rise,’ International Security, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Spring 1993), pp.5-51. 37William C. Wohlforth, ‘The Stability of a Unipolar World,’ International Security, Vol. 24, No. 1 (Summer 1999), pp.4-41. 38Kenneth N. Waltz, ‘Globalization and American Power,’ The National Interest, No. 59(Spring 2000), p.54.
——————————————————————————–
Page 12
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

65differential, not parallel, rates. A comparison of the United States and China provides a concrete example. From the mid-1980s through the late 1990s, China’s economy grew at a rate in excess of 10 percent a year, while for most of that period America’s economy grew at a 3-4 percent annual rate. In relativeterms, therefore, China has been getting stronger while the United States hasbeen declining. Chinese policymakers are indeed sensitive to relative power issues and to the relationship between a state’s economic strength and its political strength.39China’s relative economic power is increasing rapidly: its phenomenaleconomic growth rate since the early 1980s has, by some measures, catapulted it into a position as the world’s second-largest economy. If it can continue to sustain its near-double digit growth rates into the early decades of this century, it is projected to surpass the United States as the world’s leading economy.40Itis China’s explosive growth that is fueling its rise as a great power. The difference between China’s growth rates and America’s means that the distribution of relative power is shifting, and that China will emerge as a challenger to US global hegemony. As the historian Paul Kennedy has shown,time and again relative ‘economic shifts heralded the rise of new Great Powers which one day would have a decisive impact on the military territorial order’.41Growth rate differentials, however, are only part of the story. The nature of the international system (its ‘systemic structure’) plays a major role in the process of great-power emergence. In a realist world, states that have the potential to become great powers have strong, security-driven, ‘structural’ incentives for doing so. To be able to protect themselves from others, states need to acquire the same kinds of capabilities that their rivals possess. The competitive nature of international politics spurs states to emulate the successful characteristics of their rivals, especially in the realms of military doctrine and technology. If others do well in developing effective instrumentsof competition, a state must respond in kind or face the consequences of falling behind. From this standpoint, it is to be expected that in crucial respects, great powers will look and act very much alike. It is also to be expected that this ‘sameness effect’ will impel states that are potential great 39See David Shambaugh, ‘Growing Strong: China’s Challenge to Asian Security,’ Survival 36 (Summer 1994), p.44. Shambaugh notes that Chinese strategists have been strongly influenced by Paul Kennedy’s The Rise and Fall of Great Powers.40See for example Harry Harding, ‘A Chinese Colossus?’ Journal of Strategic Studies 18, September 1995, p.106. Harding estimates that China will surpass the United States and Japan as the world’s largest economy by the twenty-first century’s second decade 41Paul Kennedy, The Rise and Fall of Great Powers: Economic Change and Military Conflict From 1500 to 2000 (New York: Random House, 1987), p.xxii.
——————————————————————————–
Page 13
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY

66powers actually to become great powers, and to acquire all the capabilities attendant to that status. States that fail to conform to this imperative will pay the price. As the noted realist Kenneth Waltz observes, ‘In a self-help system,the possession of most but not all of the capabilities of a great power leaves a state vulnerable to others who have the instruments that the lesser state lacks’.42Another factor driving the process of great-power emergence is the tendency of states to ‘balance’ against others that are too strong or too threatening. Balancing is the term theorists use to describe a commonsensical aspect of states’ behavior. When a state feels threatened because another is too powerful, it will try to offset the other’s strength (either by building up its own military capabilities and/or by acquiring allies). The reason states balance is to correct a skewed distribution of relative power in the international system.The pressure to balance is especially strong in a unipolar system such as that which came into existence with the Soviet Union’s collapse. Historical experience leads to the expectation that America’s present hegemony should generate the rise of countervailing power in the form of new great powers. By definition, the distribution of relative power in a unipolar system is extremely unbalanced. Consequently, in a unipolar system, the structural pressures onpotential great powers (like China) to increase their relative capabilities and become great powers should be overwhelming. If they do not acquire great-power capabilities, they may be exploited by the hegemon. Of course, a potential great power’s quest for security may trigger a classic security dilemma. China’s great-power emergence is illustrative. China’s rise to great-power status in the long term is a virtual certainty, given its actual and latent power capabilities. But China’s rise is likely to occur sooner rather than later, because in a unipolar world China has very strong incentives to balance against US power. In this sense, the immediate impetus for China’s rise is a defensive reaction to America’s hegemonic position. At the same time,however, China’s rise has made others, including the United States,apprehensive about their own security.Can China Compete Militarily? China today lacks the two strategic prerequisites of great-power status:power-projection capabilities and a high-tech military. At present, China is unable to project air and naval power adequate to back up its claims to the South China Sea and, notwithstanding its robust policy toward Taipei, it could 42Kenneth Waltz, ‘The Emerging Structure of International Politics,’ International Security 19 (Fall 1994), p.21.
——————————————————————————–
Page 14
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

67not today invade Taiwan successfully. Moreover, China lags far behind the United States (and Japan, as well) in its capacity to field high-tech military forces. One need not accept the extravagant claims of some military analysts that a ‘revolution’ in military affairs is occurring to realize that modern technology has an important role in warfare. The Persian Gulf War, Kosovo, and the campaign against Afghanistan offered glimpses into the battlefield of the future, where sensors, computers, real-time communications, stealthy weapons platforms, and precision-guided munitions will dominate. Before it can compete militarily against the United States (or a rearmed Japan), Chinafirst must build up a modern aerospace and avionics industry (which it presently lacks), and develop the other infrastructural components needed to support a 21stcentury military (electronics, microchips, fiber-optics, ceramics,and robotics – to name but a few). Over the long term, China is bound to aim for military parity with the United States. For sure, there are many American strategists who believe China is too far behind the US to entertain hope of ever catching up, and who also claim, as Andrew Nathan and Robert Ross maintain, that even trying to close the gap is futile because such a policy ‘risks stimulating its neighbors to accelerate their own pace of advance, potentially widening rather than narrowing the gap between China’s security needs and its military capabilities’. Arguments of this sort reflect a peculiar logic and are myopic historically. If this argument is correct, no late-emerging great power would ever attempt to catch up to the dominant great power in the system. Yet, for all the reasonsalready discussed, latecomers do try (and sometimes succeed) in challenging the system’s dominant power.43One can hardly imagine, for example, German or American policymakers in the late nineteenth century saying, ‘Oh well, we can never hope to match Britain strategically, and we will be less secure if we try, so we will just have to accept that England’s supremacy is a permanent fact of geopolitical life.’ Neither should we imagine that China as a great power would be content to accept US political dominance and military superiority—and if it did, in what meaningful sense could we even speak of China as being a great power? The question of whether China can equal, or surpass, the United States in military effectiveness and capability is related to, but analytically distinct from, 43Andrew Nathan and Robert Ross, The Great Wall and the Empty Fortress: China’s Search for Security (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 1997). There is an important literature demonstrating that latecomers enjoy ‘the advantages of backwardness.’ The seminal work isAlexander Gerschenkron, The Advantages of Economic Backwardness in Historical Perspective(Cambridge, Ma.: Belknap Press, 1962).
——————————————————————————–
Page 15
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY

68the issue of whether China will attain great-power standing. Great-powerstatus is a threshold that, when crossed, would mean that China will possess (at least to a considerable degree) the tangible resource inputs (in terms of finances, a defense industrial base, technology, and skilled personnel) needed to field a military force capable of competing against the United States.However, whether China actually would be able to use those resourceseffectively is another issue. As military historians Allan R. Millett, Williamson Murray, and Kenneth Watman have observed, ‘military effectiveness is the process by which armed forces convert resources into fighting power.’44Hence the key question is whether China can convert its resources into effective and capable military power. Although much has been written about the linked issues of military innovation, effectiveness, and competence, we still understand imperfectly their underlying causal factors. Why are some militaries innovative and others not? Why are some militaries effective and competent and others not? Moreover, beyond understanding causation, there is the issue of identifying signposts. What factors should we look for to determine whether a particular military is likely to be innovative, effective, or competent?Analysts have employed three analytical approaches to answer these questions: societal, organizational, and realist. The societal perspective (which focuses on how the cohesiveness, or divisiveness, of society affects military effectiveness) and the organizational theory perspective (which identifies a number of pathologies that make it difficult for organizations to innovate effectively) have ambiguous implications with respect to the question of whether China will be able to innovate successfully in the military sphere. The realist perspective, however, suggests strongly that China, over time, will be able to close the military gap currently separating it from the United States.States emulate their rivals, especially militarily. As political scientist ColinElman has observed, ‘Perhaps more than in any other area, military technologies, strategies, and institutions are adopted because of perceptions of what other states are doing’.45Security expert Barry Posen has identified the external factors that correlate with a state’s success in innovating militarily: the perception of a highly threatening international environment, and revisionist 44Allan R. Millett, Williamson Murray, and Kenneth Watman, ‘The Effectiveness of Military Organizations,’ in Military Effectiveness, Volume I: The First World War, ed. Allan R. Millett and Williamson Murray (Boston: Unwin and Hyman, 1987), p.2.45Colin Elman, ‘Do Unto Others as They Would Unto You? The Internal and External Determinants of Military Practices’ (Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, Harvard University, unpublished paper, May 1996), p.3.
——————————————————————————–
Page 16
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE69ambitions.

46China fits Posen’s profile. It is a state that believes it lives in a high-threat environment, and it has irredentist goals in Taiwan and the South China Sea. The safest assumption for American policymakers is that duringthis century’s early decades China will emerge as a military competitor of the United States. Between Now and Then Although the odds are strongly in favor of China reaching peer competitorstatus, this is not something that will occur overnight. It will take China some time to close the gap between itself and the United States with respect to material capabilities. An interesting question, therefore, is how, during its transition from potential to actual peer competitor, will a rising great power like China counter American hegemony? Given America’s apparent inclination to use preventive/pre-emptive strategies to counter future threats,rising great powers will have good reason to view the transitional interval as one during which they will be vulnerable strategically. Rising great powers like China likely will be attracted to asymmetric strategies as a means of offsetting superior US military capabilities. The terms ‘asymmetric warfare,’ ‘asymmetric threats’, and ‘asymmetric strategies’, have become buzzwords much favored by policymakers and analysts. A little bit of perspective is in order. When discussing asymmetric state responses to hegemony (in today’s world, to US hegemony) it is first necessary to specify the level of analysis being discussed. At the grand strategic level, research on the initiation of asymmetric conflicts tells us that weaker powers often rationally pick fights with stronger powers for a numberof reasons.47For example, such states may calculate that although the overallmaterial distribution of power is adverse to them, they can still hope to prevail by using clever strategies (for example, pursuing a ‘limited aims’ strategy), and because the ‘balance of resolve’ favors them. The balance of resolve reflects asymmetries in motivation: if the stakes are greater for the weaker power, it may be prepared to take greater risks, and pay higher costs than a defender who regards the stakes as less than vital to its own security interests.48Similarly,46Barry R. Posen, The Sources of Military Doctrine: Britain, France, and Germany Between the World Wars (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1984). 47The key work is T.V. Paul, Asymmetric Conflicts: War Initiation by Great Powers (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994). 48In his classic study, Andrew Mack demonstrates that weaker powers often count on favorable asymmetries in motivation to offset an unfavorable asymmetry in material capabilities. Specifically, weaker powers often calculate that if the stakes in the conflict are vital to itself but peripheral to a more powerful defender, domestic political factors ultimately
——————————————————————————–
Page 17
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY

70weaker powers will try to develop methods of war-fighting that neutralize the advantages (material and/or qualitative) enjoyed by a stronger adversary. At the operational and tactical levels, asymmetric responses by others to a hegemon may be manifested in the weaker power’s choice of weapons systems, operational doctrine, and tactics. Of course, there is nothing novelabout asymmetric responses, which are as old as war itself. If its strategists are smart, a weaker power in an asymmetric contest will not attempt to slug it out with a stronger foe. As Edward Luttwak has noted, the essence of strategy always has been the ability to identify, and exploit, the opponent’s political, operational, and tactical vulnerabilities.49Short of using nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons, a state like China which possibly is striving for, but has not yet attained, great-power status can employ other asymmetric means to offset superior US capabilities.50Forexample, because American forces depend significantly on basing facilities provided by allies in key regions, a weaker adversary like China might use ballistic missiles, and/or special operations forces to deny the US access tothese facilities in the event of conflict, or to at least disrupt US force deployments.51Similarly, although unable to match the United States in key leading-edge military technologies (command, control, communications, real-time reconnaissance and surveillance), an emerging China that still is a non-peer competitor might acquire low-cost technologies and information-warfare capabilities that could disable the satellites and computers upon which the American military depends for its battlefield superiority. In sum, even if, inthe short term, others lack the capability to ‘balance’ against American hegemony in the traditional sense, the very fact of US preponderance givesthem strong incentives to develop strategies, weapons, and doctrines that willenable them to offset American capabilities. Indeed, this is exactly what Beijing seems to be doing. Unable as yet to go toe-to-toe with the US in a will constrain the stronger power from incurring high costs to defeat the weaker power. See Andrew Mack, ‘Why Big Nations Lose Small Wars: The Politics of Asymmetric Conflict,‘ World Politics, Vol. 27 (January 1975), pp.175-200. 49Edward Luttwak, Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace (Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Pressof Harvard University Press, 1987), p.16. 50For an analysis of how a China that failed to achieve peer competitor status might nonetheless prevail (or perceive that it could prevail) in an asymmetric conflict with the United States fought over the fate of Taiwan, see Thomas Christensen, ‘Posing Problems without Catching Up: China’s Rise and Challenges for US Security Policy’, International Security (Spring 2001).51For a discussion of the possible asymmetric use of ballistic and cruise missiles to hinder USability to project power into East Asia, see Paul J. Bracken, Fire in the East: The Rise of Asian Military Power and the Second Nuclear Age (New York: Harper Collins, 1999).
——————————————————————————–
Page 18
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

71great-power war, China is concentrating its military buildup on the kinds of capabilities—air power, cruise and ballistic missiles, diesel submarines—it would need to prevail in a showdown with the United States over Taiwan.52In the longer term, the very fact of US global preponderance is certain to spurChina’s emergence as a true peer competitor. CONTENDING WITH AN EMERGING CHINA: AMERICAN STRATEGYAs realist theory suggests, security concerns are driving China’s economicmodernization. Chinese leaders understand the security dilemma (that is, so long as China is weak, it is vulnerable to the US) and hold an essentially realist conception of international politics. Beijing views an American-dominated unipolar world as inherently threatening. China is therefore committed to ‘balancing’ against preponderant American power (by building up its own capabilities) and favors a multipolar system (that is, a system where there is more than a single great power) in which US influence would be diminished. Historical experience suggests that the emergence of new great powers usually has a destabilizing effect on international politics. Or, in plain English, conflict is more likely during eras when new great powers are emerging, because it is very difficult to reconcile the competing interests of the risingnew great power and the established, status quo, great powers (or, in today’s world, the one and only great power). Whether China’s rise to great-power status will prove disruptive is, of course, one of the crucial questions analysts must answer as they attempt to peer into the future. American grand strategy harbors the hope that economic interdependence and domestic politicalliberalization will tame China so that its great-power emergence can be successfully and peacefully accommodated. But these hopes are bound to prove illusory. Economic Interdependence In US policy circles, a frequently heard argument is that as China becomesincreasingly tied to the international economy, its ‘interdependence’ with others will constrain it from taking political actions that could disrupt its vital connection to foreign markets and capital, and to high-technology importsfrom the United States, Japan, and Western Europe. This claim was made time and again by the Clinton administration and its supporters in the debate about whether the US should extend permanent normal trade relations to 52Craig S. Smith, ‘China Reshaping Military to Toughen Its Muscle in the Region,’ New York Times, October 16, 2002.
——————————————————————————–
Page 19
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY

72China, and support Beijing’s accession to the World Trade Organization. ‘Interdependence’ is another way of saying that trade is a tie that binds statesto follow peaceful, cooperative foreign policies. Why should this be the case (or, as political scientists say, what is the ‘causal logic’ underlying this proposition)? That is, what is it specifically about interdependence that purportedly causes peace? Several causal logics underpin the ‘interdependence leads to peace’argument. One is that as their prosperity comes to be ever more tightly bound to the global economy, states simply cannot afford the disruption of trade that would result from war. Another is the claim that in today’s technology and information-oriented global economy, trade, not conquest, is the most efficient road to achieving national wealth. Many American policymakers subscribe strongly to the belief that China will be a cooperative actor in the internationalsystem because its economic modernization requires its integration into the global economy and, as it becomes more interdependent with the outside world, it will find that interdependence has created a web of common interestswith states that otherwise might be geopolitical rivals. The ‘interdependence leads to peace’ argument, however, is inherently suspect. After all, Europe never was more interdependent (economically, and intellectually and culturally, as well) than it was on the eve of the First World War. Obviously, the prospect of forgoing the economic gains of trade did not stop Europe’s great powers from fighting a prolonged and devastating war. Implicit in the ‘interdependence leads to peace’ argument is the notion that statesmen think like accountants; but they do not. Calculations of possible economic gain or loss are seldom the determining factor when policymakersdecide on war or peace. And even if they were, there is little reason to believe that economic interdependence would be a deterrent to war. This is because even for the losers, the negative economic consequences of modern great-power wars have been of short duration. China’s recent conduct suggests further reason to be skeptical of the ‘interdependence leads to peace’ argument: Beijing is not acting as the theory predicts. As political scientist Gerald Segal pointed out, China’s behavior in the Taiwan Strait and the South China Sea in the 1990s indicates that it is not constrained by fears that its muscular foreign policy will adversely affect its overseas trade.53As China becomes more powerful, it increasingly appears willing to risk short-term costs to its interests in economic interdependence in 53Gerald Segal, ‘The ‘Constrainment’ of China,’ International Security, Vol. 20 (Spring 1996), pp.107-35.
——————————————————————————–
Page 20
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

73order to pursue its geostrategic interests. Indeed, as China becomes wealthier and stronger militarily, it is (as realist theory would predict) becoming moreassertive in its external behavior. Democratic Peace The so-called democratic peace theory is also invoked to support the proposition that an impending Sino-American rivalry can be ameliorated.Among those US strategists who have taken a hard line on China, the view has taken hold that conflict with China is inevitable—unless China becomes a democracy. In part, this is because China’s external ambitions are seen as being in conflict with America’s interests. However, China’s ‘aggressiveness’ is ascribed by US hard-liners, in large measure, to the nature of its domestic political system. Simply put, the containers view China as a ‘bad’ state. This Wilsonian viewpoint is quintessentially American. The time-tested American remedy for a ‘bad’ state is to transform it into a ‘good’ state—that is,into a democracy. The Wilsonian outlook incorporates the so-called ‘democratic peace theory,’ which asserts that democracies never go to war with fellow democracies. Hence, expanding the ‘democratic zone of peace’ isdeemed a vital American security interest. Yet the democratic peace theory is singularly devoid of intellectual merit.54There are two (not mutually exclusive) causal explanations of the democratic peace: first, in democracies, statesmen are restrained from going to war by the public, upon which the human and economic costs of war fall; and second, in their external relations with one another, democratic states are governed by the same norms of peaceful dispute resolution that apply to their domestic politics. Neither causal logic holds up under scrutiny. Democracies have often gone to war enthusiastically (Britain and France in 1914, the United States in 1898). And there is an ample historical record demonstrating that, where vital national interests have been at stake, democratic states routinely have practiced big-stick, realpolitik diplomacy against other democracies (including threats to use force). Moreover, contrary to the democratic peace theory’s central tenet, democratic states have gone to war with each other.55It matters little, however, whether the democratic peace theory is true. What matters is that most of the American foreign policy community believes it is true. And this belief has consequences. After all, if a nondemocratic state (in 54For a critique of the democratic peace theory, see Christopher Layne, ‘Kant or Cant: They Myth of the Democratic Peace,’ International Security (Fall 1994). 55See Christopher Layne, ‘Shell Games, Shallow Gains and the Democratic Peace,’ International History Review (December 2001).
——————————————————————————–
Page 21
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY

74this case, China) is likely to be a trouble-maker and challenge the United States, the obvious solution to the problem is for the United States to cause that state to metamorphose into a democracy: ‘The ultimate American objective on China is to induce China to behave more responsibly and to become moredemocratic.’ The impulse to be a ‘crusader state,’ however, invariably has pushed the United States down the road of foreign policy misadventure, and will do so if Washington pushes its Wilsonian agenda on Beijing. Averting Sino-American Conflict I: Avoid the Wilsonian Trap From a realist perspective, one must conclude that a US-China great-power competition is highly likely in the future. Great-power rivalry is the norm in international politics for several reasons: anarchy among states generates legitimate security fears that require and justify self-help; reasons of state predominate over conventional interpersonal standards of behavior; and power relationships predominate over internal political characteristics in determining state behavior. But if rivalry is certain, war is not. Indeed, peace may be the most causally over-determined phenomenon in international politics. In this respect, realism is a theory about both war and peace. Because of the anarchic, self-help nature of international politics, realists believe that wars can occur and sometimes do.At the same time, many realists would argue (as would I) that war, especially great-power war, is rare. This is because for the great powers, war itself is a deterrent, albeit an imperfect one. Because of the uncertainties it entails, the decision to go to war is always (as Chancellor Bethmann-Hollweg put it in 1914) ‘a leap into the dark.’ For this reason, realists would expect most great-power crises to be resolved short of war. Indeed, because war is such a risky and uncertain business, realists would expect states to be extremely cautious in going to war. Whether the United States and China find themselves on the brink of war in the future will be determined as much by Washington’s policies as by Beijing’s. There are two elements of its grand strategy toward China that Washington needs to reconsider, and they are linked: trade, and domestic liberalization. Trade is an issue where almost all parties in the current debate about America’s China policy have gotten it wrong. Engagement (based on economic interdependence and free trade) will neither constrain China to behave ‘responsibly’ nor lead to an evolutionary transformation of China’s domestic system (certainly not in any policy-relevant time span). Unfettered free trade, however, will simply accelerate the pace of China’s great-power emergence: the more China becomes linked to the global economy, the more rapidly it is able to grow in both absolute and relative economic power. To be
——————————————————————————–
Page 22
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

75sure, short of preventive war, there is nothing the United States can do to prevent China from eventually emerging as a great power. Thus, there would be no point to simply ceasing economic relations with China. But the United States must be careful about how—and why—it trades with Beijing. American trade with China should be driven by strategic, not market, considerations. If Washington cannot prevent China’s rise to great-power status, it nonetheless does have some control over the pace of China’s great-power emergence. A US trade policy that helps accelerate this process is shortsighted and contrary to America’s strategic interests. The United States should aim to reduce China’s export surplus to deprive it of hard-currency reserves that Beijing will use to import high technology (which it will use to modernize its military). Washington should also tightly regulate the direct outflow of critical advanced technology from the United States to China in the form of licensing, offset, or joint-venture agreements. Individual corporations may have an interest in penetrating the Chinese market, but there is no American interest, for example, in permitting US firms to facilitate China’s development of an advanced aerospace industry. On the other hand, those US hard-liners who want to use Sino-American trade as a bludgeon to compel Beijing to accept America’s dictates with respect to human rights and democratization also have got it wrong: while American leverage is too limited to have any significant positive effects, Washington’s attempts to transform China domestically will inflame Sino-American relations. American attempts to ‘export’ democracy to China are especially shortsighted and dangerous. America’s values are not universally accepted as a model to be emulated, least of all by China. Moreover, America’s attempts to universalize its liberal values and institutions are more likely to be regarded by others as an exercise of hegemonic power rather than as an act of unselfish altruism. Indeed, it is commonplace to observe that the United States invokes its values as a means of legitimizing its predominant role in international politics. As the political scientist Samuel P. Huntington has observed, an American policy based on the universal applicability of liberal democratic ideology is the ‘ideology of the West for confrontation with non-Western cultures’.56American efforts to force China to adhere to American norms and values,in fact, have sharpened Sino-American tensions. Chinese president Jiang 56Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996), p.66.
——————————————————————————–
Page 23
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY7

6Zemin’s October 1995 remarks to the UN Security Council are illustrative. In his speech, he observed that ‘certain big powers, often under the cover of freedom, democracy and human rights, set out to encroach upon the sovereignty of other countries, interfere in their internal affairs and undermine their national unity and ethnic harmony.’57The attempt to export democracy will cause a geopolitical backlash by strengthening China’s resolve to resist US hegemony. Kenneth Waltz perceptively observes why this is so: The powerful state may, and the United States does, think of itself asacting for the sake of peace, justice, and well-being in the world. But these terms will be defined to the liking of the powerful, which may conflict with the preferences and the interests of others. In international politics, overwhelming power repels and leads others to try to balance against it. With benign intent, the United States hasbehaved, and until its power is brought into a semblance of balance,will continue to behave in ways that annoy and threaten others.58The truth is that China is not going to become a democracy—certainly not any time soon—and the United States lacks the power to compel China to transform its domestic political system. American efforts to do so can only serve to heighten tensions between Washington and Beijing. Chinese leaders fear, and oppose, American hegemony, and they regard America’s attempts to foist its political and culturalvalues on China as a specific manifestation of American ‘hegemonism’. Averting Sino-American Conflict II: Taiwan Taiwan is a powder-keg issue. China remains committed to nationalreunification, yet Taiwan is moving perceptibly toward independence. Almost certainly, Beijing would regard a Taiwanese declaration of independence as a casus belli. It is unclear how the United States would respond to a China-Taiwan conflict, although President George W. Bush created a stir in 2001 when he declared the United States would intervene militarily in the event of a Chinese attack on Taiwan. For sure, however, it is safe to predict that there would be strong domestic political pressure in favor of American intervention. Beyondthe arguments that Chinese military action against Taiwan would undermine US interests in a stable world order and constitute unacceptable ‘aggression,’ ideological antipathy toward China and support for a democratizing Taiwan would be powerful incentives for American intervention. 57Quoted in Alison Mitchell, ‘Meager Progress as China Leader and Clinton Meet,’ New York Times, October 25, 1995. 58Kenneth Waltz, ‘America as a Model for the World? A Foreign Policy Perspective,’ PS(December 1991), p.669.
——————————————————————————–
Page 24
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

77American strategists advance three reasons why the United States should defend Taiwan: strategic; reputational; and ideological. Strategically, Taiwan must be defended to protect the trade routes in the South China Sea. What this argument overlooks, however, is that these shipping routes are of vital Japanese interest but are relatively unimportant for the United States. The reputational argument is that unless the United States defends Taiwan from China, other states will lose confidence in America’s security guarantees and acquiesce in China’s regional hegemony. This argument overlooks two points: first, once China becomes a great power, the credibility of US commitments in East Asia inevitably will diminish; and, second, regardless of what the United States does with respect to Taiwan, other East Asian states will balance against a threatening China in self-defense, rather than jump on its bandwagon. The ideological argument, already mentioned, is that the United States cannot afford to stand on the sidelines while a fellow democracy is conquered by an authoritarian great power. During the 1996 tensions between Taiwan and China, leading members ofthe foreign-policy community argued that US interests required support for Taiwan because the real issue at stake was the need to defend a democratic state menaced by a totalitarian one. A leading Asian affairs expert argued, for example, that the issue between China and Taiwan had nothing to do with the latter’s political status as a province of mainland China. Rather, it was claimed, the United States had a compelling interest in defending Taiwanese democracy and preserving it as a political model for Beijing to adopt (presumably because a democratic China, from an American perspective, would be a more tractable state):The United States must recognize that it has a fundamental interest in promoting Chinese democracy, and in protecting its sole example in Taiwan. Thus, we must warn China in no uncertain terms that we will not sit idly by if Taiwanese democracy is threatened, encourageour allies to make similar declarations, and continue to back up our words with a show of American naval power.59Arguments that the United States must be prepared to defend Taiwan from Chinese invasion overlook three points. First, for nearly a quarter century, the United States has recognized that Taiwan is a Chinese province, not an independent state. Second, America’s European and Asian allies have no interest in picking a quarrel with China over Taiwan’s fate. If Washington goes to the mat with Beijing over Taiwan, it almost certainly will do so alone.(Given its unilateralist bent, however, the prospect of fighting China without 59Christopher J. Sigur, ‘Why Taiwan Scares China,’ New York Times, March 19, 1996.
——————————————————————————–
Page 25
CHINA’S ROLE IN AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY

78allies might not be of much concern to the Bush II administration.) Third, by defending Taiwan, the United States runs the risk of armed confrontation with China.In the short term, a Chinese invasion of Taiwan is unlikely, and the United States would have little to fear from a military clash with China. Both of these conditions, however, are likely to change in coming years. Looking down the road a decade or two, it would be a geopolitical act of folly for the United States to risk war with China for the purpose of defending democracy in Taiwan. The issue at stake simply would not justify the risks and costs of doing so. Indeed, regardless of the rationale invoked, the contention that the United States should risk conflict to prevent Beijing from using force to achieve reunification with Taiwan amounts to nothing more than a veiled argument for a declining America to fight a ‘preventive’ war against a rising China. Here, the embrace of pre-emptive and preventive military strategies by the Bush II administration raises obvious questions. If US hard-liners believe that preventive war is a viable option for coping with a rising China, instead of using the Taiwan issue as a fig-leaf, they should say so openly so that the merits of this strategy can be debated. CONCLUSION: TOWARD AN OFFSHORE BALANCING STRATEGY IN EAST ASIA? Any realist worth his salt would agree that the rise of a new great power isreason for concern. However, while concern is prudent, panic is not. China is in the process of emerging as a great power. But it has a considerable distance to travel before it gets there—and it is conceivable (even if not likely) that it will not get there. China’s ability to attain great-power status hinges primarily on two considerations: economic growth, and the domestic political situation. On the first point, China only needs to grow at a seven to eight percent annual rate over the next ten to twenty years to surpass the United States asthe world’s largest economy. All things being equal, these growth rates appear feasible, even probable. However, all things are not equal, which leads to a second set of considerations that pertain to China’s domestic cohesion. There has been much speculation that China’s drive to great-power status may fail because of domestic internal developments. Civil unrest stemming from failed political liberalization, or the centrifugal effect of regional autonomy undermining central government control of the nation is the most frequently mentioned internal threats to China’s great-power emergence. Although these possibilities cannot be discounted, it nevertheless would appear that China is unlikely to succumb either to domestic political upheaval or to the kind of
——————————————————————————–
Page 26
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

79disintegration that could lead to a collapse of central governmental authority. Thus China’s rise to great-power status probably will not be sidetracked by internal political developments. So what should the United States do about China? If the US persists with its current hegemonic grand strategy, sooner or later, the odds of a Sino-American conflict are pretty high. Current American strategy thus commitsthe United States to maintaining the geopolitical status quo in East Asia, a status quo that reflects America’s hegemonic power and interests. America’s interest in preserving the status quo, however, is bound to clash with the ambitions of a rising China. As a great power, China no doubt would have its own ideas about how East Asia’s political and security order should beorganized. Unless US and Chinese interests can be accommodated, the potential for future tension—or worse—exists. Moreover, the very fact of American hegemony, as I have argued, is bound to produce a geopoliticalbacklash—with China in the vanguard—in the form of counter-hegemonic balancing. At the same time, the United States cannot be completely indifferent to China’s rise, either. The United States could accomplish the important goals of containing China, while yet avoiding direct conflict with Beijing, by abandoning its hegemonic grand strategy in favor of an offshore balancing grand strategy combined with a “spheres of influence” diplomacy. Throughout history great powers have been able to accommodate each other’s conflicting interestsdespite ideological differences and the fact that they seldom regard each otheras friends. Among modern international history’s great powers, only the United States seems unable to accept the fact that great powers must live in a world with others who neither like them nor share their values. The belief that America must universalize its institutions and values in order to be secure has had dreadful consequences in the past. The issue of Taiwan illustrates that this mindset may lead to disaster again in the future. The key component of a new geopolitical approach by the United Stateswould be offshore balancing.60Instead of trying to stop the emergence of new great powers, an offshore balancing grand strategy would recognize the inevitability of their emergence, and turn this to America’s advantage. Rather than fearing multipolarity, as does the present US strategy of hegemony, offshore balancing would embrace it. An offshore balancing strategy would 60On offshore balancing, see Christopher Layne, ‘From Preponderance to Offshore Balancing: America’s Future Grand Strategy,’ International Security, Vol. 19 (Summer 1997). For a discussion of how offshore balancing could work in East Asia, see Christopher Layne, ‘Less Is More,’ The National Interest, No. 43 (Spring 1996).
———————————
Le rôle de la Chine dans American Grand Strategy: PARTENAIRE, puissance régionale, OU RIVAL grande puissance?

CHRISTOPHERLAYNE

In l’American étrangère et de politique de défense les communautés conventionalwisdom maintenant que la Chine va devenir une véritable grande puissance dans le vingt et unième siècle premières décennies . Comme un commentateur a fait valoir, “un Whenhistorians cent ans écrire sur notre temps, ils mai wellconclude que l’évolution la plus significative est l’apparition de avigorous économie de marché et l’armée dans le pays le plus peuplé au monde ‘.1 Il n’est pas surprenant, donc, que, depuis le début des années 1990, Americanpolicymakers et les analystes se concentrent de plus en plus sur les implications stratégiques de l’essor de la Chine à une grande puissance. La sagesse conventionnelle américaine estime que la réflexion sur la Chine se divise en deux points de vue concurrents. Une école de pensée très répandu dans l’administration Bush II, en particulier le Pentagone-vues Chine comme une menace de plus en plus saillants pour les intérêts américains en Asie de l’Est et l’Amérique les plus probables à l’avenir une grande puissance (ou «par les pairs concurrent») rival. Affichage déjà la Chine comme un concurrent stratégique, les adhérents de tenir ce point de vue que Washington doit “contenir” la Chine. Le confinement est avant tout un géostratégique policythat d’utiliser la puissance militaire américaine à freiner les ambitions de la Chine et de Beijing obliger à adhérer à Washington règles du jeu sur des questions telles que la maîtrise des armements, la prolifération des armes, le commerce et les droits de l’homme. Pour certains, l’endiguement des États-Unis au moyen d’influence pour obliger Pékin à adhérer à la libéralisation de la Chine politique intérieure du system.The autre école de pensée avec lequel l’administration Clinton wasidentified de retenue que par «engagement» de Beijing (et il en enmeshing l’économie mondiale et de divers cadres institutionnel multilatéral) l’essor de la Chine à une grande puissance statut peut être géré, et de Beijing peut être amené à se comporter 1Nicholas Kristof, “la montée de la Chine, ‘Affaires étrangères 72 (Novembre / Décembre 1993), p .59. Analystes ne sont pas tous d’accord que la Chine émergera comme un concurrent par les pairs. Pour un résumé du débat, voir J. Thomas Christensen, «posent des problèmes sans Catching Up: l’essor de la Chine andChallenges pour la politique de sécurité américaine,« International Security, Vol. 25, n o 4 (printemps 2001), pp.5-9. 54
————————————————– ——————————
Page 2
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE

55’responsibly “dans la politique internationale. La participation est fondée sur la beliefthat, que la Chine contacts avec le monde extérieur se multiplient, le risque de “occidentales” (c’est-à-américain) valeurs politiques et culturelles se traduira par l’évolution des changements politiques en Chine. Ainsi, l’endiguement est une stratégie qui accorde plus d’importance à la traditionnelle ‘hard power’ outils de gouverner (en particulier la puissance militaire), tandis que l’engagement des lieux un peu plus de poids sur le ‘soft power’ d’idées et trade.2Containment estime que la Chine doit transformer ses système national »ou d’autre.” engagement est d’avis que, au fil du temps, la Chine va changer. Confinement souligne l’exercice de la puissance américaine. Engagement souligne les avantages à la Chine de coopérer avec la communauté internationale community.This chapitre examine le rôle de la Chine en grande stratégie américaine. Quand tout est dit et fait, il apparaît qu’il existe un consensus général viewabout l’avenir de l’sino-américaines relation, et que ce consensus dans les différences entre les conteneurs et les engagers sont de degré, non de nature. US décideurs et analystes de la politique étrangère largement d’accord pour dire que l’émergence de la Chine comme une grande puissance pourraient menacer l’Amérique de l’après-Warhegemony froide. Le débat dans les milieux politique n’est pas de savoir si la Chine une grande puissance émergence est incompatible avec les intérêts américains, mais plutôt, ce que Washington devrait faire à ce sujet. Ce chapitre va d’abord discuter de grande stratégie américaine et de ses fondements théoriques. Deuxièmement, il abordera la question de savoir si la Chine, en effet, est susceptible d’apparaître comme une grande puissance. En troisième lieu, en s’appuyant sur un aperçu des relations internationales (RI) théorie, il montrera pourquoi la rivalité stratégique entre les États-Unis et la Chine est très probable de se produire. Le chapterconcludes une prescription destinée à un grand optimale US stratégique vers une hausse China.THE INFLUENCE SUR LA THÉORIE DE GRAND STRATÉGIE Le débat sur l’Amérique politique de la Chine se concentre principalement sur plusieurs questions principales. La Chine est de devenir une grande puissance et, si tel est le cas, sera-t-il menacer les intérêts américains? Si la Chine est en train de devenir une grande puissance, sa grande peut être géré poweremergence? La Chine de plus en plus lié à l’économie mondiale de Beijing faire plus souple? La Chine devenir plus démocratique (et howmuch Si les États-Unis pour promouvoir la démocratie en Chine)? Du point de vue de la sécurité américaine, at-il une différence si la Chine est démocratique? Le présent débat sur le rôle de la Chine en grande stratégie américaine 2The distinction entre dur et la puissance douce est énoncée en Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power (New York: Basic Books, 1991) .

aborde ces questions. Ce débat, toutefois, ne peut être correctement compris sans s’aventurer dans les eaux traîtresses apparemment de la théorie des relations internationales. Je le dis d’hésitation. Toute personne qui a enseigné l’objet sait que la simple mention des mots «la théorie des relations internationales” est susceptible d’amener le public à les yeux de plus de vernis. “Mais ce n’est pas un exercice de discuter de la théorie pour la théorie de souci. Au contraire, les débats sur les politiques ont inévitablement un dimension.3The lien théorique entre la théorie et politique est particulièrement important en ce qui concerne la grande stratégie. Après tout, le concept même de la grande stratégie postule une relation entre la théorie et la politique. Comme le dit Posen, grande stratégie est un état de la théorie sur la façon dont il peut causer des meilleures pour la sécurité itself.4In de grande stratégie, les décideurs s’appuient sur leurs hypothèses sur la façon dont le monde fonctionne, c’est leurs modèles (même si seulement implicite) de la politique internationale. Grand stratégie est un ensemble de cause à effet postulatingwhich hypothèses politiques sont les plus susceptibles de produire les résultats stratégiques que les décideurs désir. Le succès d’un état de grande stratégie dépend, par conséquent, «si les hypothèses [que les responsables politiques] et englobe la corriger.« 5 Par conséquent, pour évaluer une grande stratégie, il est nécessaire de comprendre le modèle théorique (s) qui sous-tend. La Chine débat de politique illustre concrètement comment la théorie des influences politiques. Réaliste fondements de la stratégie américaine Grand universitaires appel Qu’est-ce réalisme est ce que la plupart des gens pensent lorsqu’ils entendent le mot “pouvoir politique”. Réalisme du intuition fondamentale est que la politique internationale est différente de la politique intérieure. La raison en est que, contrairement à la politique intérieure, dans les relations internationales il n’ya pas de l’autorité centrale (qui est un gouvernement) que peuvent apporter et faire appliquer des règles de conduite sur le système de participants. Lorsque réalistes parler de la politique internationale en cours anarchique, ils font référence à cette absence d’une autorité de tutelle. Quand ils parlent de la politique internationale comme un “self-help», ils signifient simplement que, dans un 3AS Stephen Van Evera observe, d’importantes questions de politique d’habitude: «On dit souvent que les travaux de prescription n’est pas théorique. L’inverse est vrai. Toutes les propositions de repos onforecasts sur les effets des politiques. Ces prévisions de repos à son tour sur implicite ou explicite des hypothèses théoriques sur les lois de politique sociale et de mouvement. De ce fait, toutes ofpublic évaluation politique exige l’élaboration et l’évaluation de la théorie, par conséquent, il est fondamentalement théorique. “Stephen Van Evera, Guide de méthodes pour les étudiants de science politique (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997), p.91. 4Barry Posen, les sources de la doctrine militaire: France, la Grande-Bretagne et en Allemagne Entre les guerres mondiales (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1984), p. 13. 5Stephen M. Walt, The Origins of Alliances (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1987), p. 2.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 4
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE57condition de l’anarchie, chaque Etat est responsable pour assurer sa propre survie et le bien-être. Bien sûr, lorsqu’un État agit pour se protéger, ses actions ont mai paradoxale conséquence de causer d’autres États à penser que leur sécurité est compromise par le premier État du comportement. Le résultat est souvent le genre de spirale que nous associons à la course aux armements. Ce cercle vicieux, où la quête de la sécurité conduit à l’aggravation de l’insécurité, est ce que les théoriciens des relations internationales appeler le «dilemme de sécurité» .6 Le dilemme de sécurité explique beaucoup de choses sur tant de Beijing et de Washington, la perception de l’sino-américaines relation . Offensifs réalisme est au cœur de l’Amérique grand strategy.7Itincorporates la clé suivante hypothèses sur la nature de internationalpolitics. Tout d’abord, la sécurité dans le système politique international est scarce.8Second, bien que tous croient réalistes la politique internationale est concurrentiel, offensive réalistes (à la différence de défense réalistes) estiment que la politique internationale est inévitablement conflictuelle-un dur, sans relâche concurrence parce qu’il n’ya pas de facteurs de compensation trempe les grandes puissances “lutte pour le pouvoir andsecurity. Troisièmement, l’insécurité omniprésente signifie que les politicsapproximates un jeu à somme nulle, c’est-à-un gain de puissance par rapport à un état est une perte de puissance relative de tous les autres, ce qui signifie qu’il n’ya pas beaucoup de place pour une grande puissance cooperation.9Fourth, dans cette serre environnement, les États sont poussés à poursuivre des stratégies offensives en maximisant leur influence powerand à leurs concurrents »expense.Given le fait que, pour les grandes puissances, la politique internationale est un dur, sans relâche la lutte pour la survie, ce grand stratégie est prescrite par le réalisme offensif? En termes simples, réalistes offensive dire les grandes puissances devraient maximiser leur pouvoir en vue de parvenir à la sécurité. L’Université de Chicago politique scientifique John J. Mearsheimer dit », affirme rapidement comprendre que la meilleure façon d’assurer leur survie est d’être le plus puissant dans le système.’106On Le dilemme de sécurité, voir John Herz, de réalisme politique et politiques Idéalisme (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951), p. 24. Aussi, voir Robert Jervis, «La coopération au titre du dilemme de sécurité», World Politics, Vol. 30, n ° 2 (Janvier 1978), pp.167-214. 7Key travaux sur le réalisme offensif notamment, John J. Mearsheimer, la tragédie de grande puissance politique (New York: WW Norton, 2001); Fareed Zakaria, de la richesse de puissance: Les origines inhabituelles d’Amérique du rôle mondial (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998); Eric J. Labs, “Réalisme et offensifs États Pourquoi élargir leurs objectifs de sécurité,« Security Studies, Vol. 6, n o 4 (été 1997), Christopher Layne, «La ‘Poster enfant de réalisme offensif:« l’Amérique Global Hegemon, «études de sécurité. Vol12. N o 2 (automne 2003). 8Mearsheimer, pp.7-13; Zakaria, op.cit., P. 13; Labs, op.cit., Pp.1, 7-8. 9Mearsheimer, pp.12-13; Zakaria, op.cit., Pp.29-30; Labs, op.cit., P. 11. 10Mearsheimer, p. 33. Aussi, voir Tellis, à la domination Drive, pp.376-379, 381-382.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 5
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY58Offensive réalistes crois que, en raison de la structure du système, les Etats peuvent jamais se contenter d’avoir «juste assez de pouvoir, parce que c’est un état impossiblefor de savoir combien d’énergie est réellement suffisant pour assurer sa sécurité . Pour les grandes puissances, le moyen de sortir du «dilemme de sécurité» est d’éliminer la concurrence, et de devenir un hégémon. Comme offensive réalistes vue, «l’exercice du pouvoir ne s’arrête que lorsque l’hégémonie est atteint,” parce que les grandes puissances pour «le meilleur moyen d’assurer leur sécurité est de parvenir à l’hégémonie maintenant, ce qui élimine toute possibilité de contestation par une autre grande puissance». 11Liberal Influences on American Grand Strategy US Bien que grande stratégie est fondamentalement en forme de réalisme offensif, il a également un élément important qui est tirée de l’approche libérale toIR théorie (également connu sous le nom de wilsonianisme, ou l’internationalisme libéral). La raison en est que l’Amérique est grande stratégie, en tant qu’ancien secrétaire d’Etat James A. Baker III a dit, «un mélange complexe de politiques idéalisme et de réalisme» .12 Ou, comme l’administration Bush II en 2002 Stratégie de sécurité nationale des États-Unis dit lui-même, grande stratégie des États-Unis est “basée sur un internationalisme typiquement américain qui reflète l’union de nos valeurs et nos intérêts nationaux» .13 Amérique hégémonique de grande stratégie, en fait, est une “realpolitik plus” grande stratégie-une grande stratégie que définit les intérêts nationaux des États-Unis tant en termes de puissance et de la promotion des idéaux-US qui est la raison pour laquelle il a été étiqueté comme «réalisme libéral», ou «l’intérêt national libéralisme» .14 En grande stratégie américaine, le libéralisme est musclé, pas «idéaliste», e il postule de cause à effet des liens sur la façon dont les États-Unis peuvent renforcer sa sécurité. Dans le cadre de l’affaire à intégrer libérale objectifs en grande stratégie des États-Unis, les libéraux parler la langue de réalisme. Le libéral et réaliste impulsions en grande stratégie américaine ne peut bedisentangled parfaitement les uns des autres parce qu’il ya une logique circulaire qui tiesthem ensemble. Un ordre mondial libéral semble être favorable aux intérêts américains, et de renforcer la puissance de l’Amérique et de la sécurité, donc, car les États-Unis est très puissant dans la politique internationale, il devrait user de son pouvoir de créer un ordre mondial libéral afin qu’il peut obtenir plus de sécurité pour lui-même. En 11Mearsheimer, pp.34, 35. 12James A. Baker, III, The Politics of Diplomacy: Revolution, la guerre et la paix, 1989-1982 (New York: GP Putnam’s Sons, 1995), p.654. 13Unites États gouvernement, la stratégie de sécurité nationale des États-Unis d’Amérique (Washington DC, Septembre 2002), p.1.14The terme «realpolitik plus” Robert est l’art. Voir Robert J. Art, “Géopolitique Mise à jour: La stratégie d’engagement sélectif», International Security, Vol. 23, n ° 3, p. 80. Les termes «libéral réalisme” et “l’intérêt national libéralisme», sont utilisés respectivement par David Stiegerwald, idéalisme wilsonien en Amérique (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994) et de Tony Smith, «Tirer le monde plus sûr pour la démocratie,« Histoire diplomatique , Vol. 23, n o 2 (printemps 1999), p.183

fait, le réalisme offensif précisément conduit à l’espoir qu’une grande puissance hégémonique utilisera sa prépondérance d’accroître à la fois dur et sa puissance douce, et observent les deux mutuellement reinforcing.What sont les libéraux qui approche à la RI théorie, et quels sont ses principaux assertions? Il existe trois principaux volets de la pensée libérale sur la politique internationale: le libéralisme politique (également connu sous le nom de la paix démocratique théorie), le libéralisme commercial, et institutionnalisme libéral. Le libéralisme politique central des sinistres et les libéraux sont dans le stade ici, est que les libéraux (ou démocratique) déclare ne pas (ou rarement) se battre entre eux, et ne le font pas (ou rarement) l’utilisation des menaces militaires dans leurs relations les uns avec les autres . Le libéralisme politique également des pistes de l’équilibre de la menace par la théorie suggérant que d’autres États libéraux ne équilibre contre un puissant (voire hégémonique) Etat libéral, parce qu’ils savent ne pas utiliser ses capacités de nuire them.15Commercialliberalism (qui aujourd’hui est essentiellement synonyme de concepts de l’interdépendance économique internationale, et «la mondialisation») estime que le commerce international et de l’interdépendance conduire à la paix, ou au moins faire la guerre beaucoup moins likely.16Commercial libéralisme la clé de revendications ont été parfaitement résumée par Arthur Stein: La guerre est coûteuse, et l’échange est bénéfique. Les perspectives ofcommerce augmenter les coûts associés à la guerre, et le développement du commerce crée une circonscription à la presse casefor la paix. Comme les gouvernements devienne plus représentatif, greaterthe la mesure dans laquelle ces frais viennent à être inclus dans des calculs politiques et décisions et de se refléter dans les politicalsystem.17Liberal institutionnalisme estime que les institutions internationales ou de régimes de faciliter la coopération mutuellement avantageuse qui ne peut être atteint lorsque les États volontairement renoncer à une action unilatérale en faveur de collaboration.Thus multilatéral, il est dit, les institutions d’atténuer les effets de l’anarchie économique dans les deux 15As Michael Doyle a déclaré: «dénigrer l’équilibre pacifique union [entre les démocraties libérales] et devraient donc être rejeté par les libéraux dans leurs relations les uns avec les autres “. Doyle,« Politics and Grand Strategy », p. 35. 16For une vue d’ensemble, voir Stein, «l’interdépendance économique et de la coopération internationale», pp.244-254. Stein conclut (p.290) que, bien que les échanges économiques et de l’interdépendance ne permet pas d’assurer la paix, ils ne font la guerre moins probable. L’ouvrage sur l’interdépendance est Robert O. Keohane et Joseph S. Nye, Jr., de l’énergie et l’interdépendance (Boston: Little, Brown, 2ED., 1989). 17Stein, «l’interdépendance économique et de la coopération internationale», p.255. Pour un récent argument que la démocratie, le libre-échange, et de l’interdépendance économique internationale sont interdépendants voir Tony Smith, America’s Mission: Les États-Unis et le monde lutte pour la démocratie au XXe siècle (New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1995), pp .327-329.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 7
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY60and relations de sécurité entre les États. Comme Robert Axelrod et Robert O. Keohane font valoir, même dans un monde d’États indépendants que sont la garde jalousement leur souveraineté, salle existe pour les nouveaux et de meilleurs arrangements mutuellement à atteindre des résultats satisfaisants, tant en termes de bien-être économique et sécurité militaire ».18 libéralisme L ‘essentiel est qu’il postule l’existence d’un cercle vertueux entre la démocratie, une économie internationale ouverte, les institutions et international. America’s Grand Strategy hégémonique En éliminant la seule Amérique grande puissance rivale, l’Union soviétique s’est effondrée, voûté les États-Unis dans une position d’hégémonie mondiale incontestée. Depuis la guerre froide à la fin, l’objectif déclaré de US grande stratégie a été de consolider et d’étendre l’hégémonie américaine dans le système international. Ce premier est apparu en Mars 1992, date à laquelle le premier projet de défense du Pentagone planification d’orientation (DPG) pour les exercices 1994-1999 a été une fuite au New York Times.19The DPG fait clair que l’objectif de US grande stratégie serait désormais de maintenir la prépondérance de l’Amérique en empêchant l’émergence de nouvelles grandes puissances rivales. Comme le DPG a déclaré, «nous devons maintenir les mécanismes pour dissuader des concurrents potentiels de même aspirant à une plus grande régional ou mondial rôle» .20 Cette stratégie vise non seulement à contrecarrer l’émergence du «suspects habituels» (une augmentation de Chine, ou une résurgence Russie), mais aussi la montée en puissance grand état d’Amérique principaux alliés de la guerre froide, l’Allemagne et le Japon. Comme le DPG a dit: “Nous devons suffisamment compte des intérêts des grands pays industrialisés afin de les dissuader de contester notre leadership ou qui cherchent à renverser l’ordre politique afin oreconomic” .2118 Robert Axelrod et Robert O. Keohane, “La réalisation de la coopération au titre de l’anarchie” , David A. Baldwin ed., Néoréalisme et le néolibéralisme: le débat contemporain (New York: Columbia University Press, 1993), p.113. Cette demande est faite également dans Robert O. Keohane et Lisa Martin, «L’avenir de la théorie institutionnelle, ‘, Michael Brown et al eds., Théories de la guerre et la paix (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998), pp.390-391. Selon Keohane, les États ne vous inquiétez pas, en soi, sur la répartition asymétrique des gains de la coopération. Préoccupé par les gains par rapport se pose seulement lorsqu’il ya une probabilité (et non pas seulement une possibilité) qu’un autre se servira de son rapport des gains d’une manière qui affectent l’état de ses intérêts. Lorsque la coopération est institutionnalisée, la probabilité de gains asymétriques utilisés dans les mêmes conditions est faible. Voir aussi Robert O. Keohane, “Théorie institutionnaliste et le défi réaliste», dans David Baldwin op.cit. pp.275-277, 281-283. 19Patrick E. Tyler, «US Plan stratégique Appels d’assurance n ° Rivals mettre au point,« New York Times, 8March 1992, p.A1. De 20’Excerpts Plan du Pentagone: «Empêcher la ré-émergence d’un nouveau Rival ‘,’ New York Times, 8 Mars 1992, p.A14 (C’est nous qui soulignons). 21Ibid.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 8
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE61The administration Clinton a réaffirmé que la perpétuation de l’hégémonie des États-Unis d’Amérique a été la clé de grand objectif stratégique. Le Mai 1997 Rapport quadriennal de la Defense Review (QDR), établi par l’administration Clinton, a clairement adopté la géopolitique objectif de maintenir l’hégémonie américaine. En 1997, la QDR prémisse sous-jacente est que «Les États-Unis sont la seule superpuissance au monde d’aujourd’hui, et devrait le rester tout au long de la période 1997-2015» .22 Bien que pas aussi brutal que le DPG, très similarlanguage dans la QDR 1997 indique clairement que l’après-2015 US objectif de grande stratégie, et la posture militaire qui sous-tendent, serait de garder les choses Justas ils ont été géopolitique: «il est impératif que les États-Unis de maintenir sa supériorité militaire en face de l’évolution, ainsi comme discontinue, de menaces et de défis. Sans cette supériorité, notre capacité à exercer un leadership mondial et de créer les conditions internationales favorables à la réalisation de nos objectifs nationaux serait en doubt.23In à court terme, de 1997 QDR specifiedthat l’objectif de US grande stratégie est d’empêcher “l’émergence d’une coalition régionale hostiles ou hégémon ».24 Dans sa automne 2002 Stratégie de sécurité nationale des États-Unis, l’administration Bush II a suivi la Bush I et administrations Clinton à faire du maintien de l’hégémonie américaine mondiale le principal objectif de grande stratégie des États-Unis. Hégémons sont comme des entreprises de monopole sur le marché. Neitherlike la concurrence, et les deux agir de manière stratégique afin de prévenir l’émergence de rivals.The l’administration Bush II de 2001 d’examen quadriennal de la défense, et ses 2002National stratégie de sécurité, une preuve claire détermination à faire en sorte que l’Amérique du hégémonie mondiale ne saurait être contestée. QDR de 2001 stipule que les États-Unis cherche à maintenir des soldes favorables pouvoir »dans des régions clés comme l’Asie de l’Est, dans le golfe Persique et Europe.25The États-Unis ce 22William S. Cohen, Rapport de la période quadriennale Defense Review (Washington DC, Mai 1997), article 2. 23Ibid., S.3. À l’instar de nombreux documents bureaucratiques, la QDR jette sa recommandation de politique raisonnable que le moyen terme entre deux options extrêmes inacceptables. Dans la QDR, la première option serait axée rejeté stratégie des Etats-Unis et la structure de la force à court terme sur les menaces, «alors que les préparatifs en grande partie le report de la possibilité d’une plus exigeants défis en matière de sécurité dans l’avenir.” Inacceptable La deuxième option est l’inverse: sacrifier les capacités actuelles de préparer les futures menaces de la part de grandes puissances régionales ou mondiales concurrents par les pairs. “Le chemin adopté par la QDR” se concentre sur la satisfaction de près et à long terme, reflétant le point de vue notre position dans le monde n’ont pas les moyens de nous la possibilité de choisir entre les deux. “La QDR englobe donc clairement l’objectif à long terme de prévenir l’émergence de concurrents de grande puissance. C’est, il réaffirme le grand objectif stratégique de maintenir les États-Unis comme le seul grand pouvoir sur les deux à court terme, et l’après-2015 à long terme. 24Ibid. (C’est nous qui soulignons). 25Department de la Défense, quadriennale Defense Review Report (Washington DC: Septembre 2001), p. 2, 4, 11, 15.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 9
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY62aim par le maintien de la supériorité militaire écrasante de sorte qu’il peut dissuader les autres pays de l’ouverture de futurs concours militaire “contre les Etats-Unis, et, si nécessaire,” imposer la volonté des États-Unis … sur les adversaires.’26The 2002 stratégie de sécurité nationale des Etats encore plus clairement que l’objectif ofAmerican stratégie est d’empêcher tout autre État de constitution de capacités militaires dans l’espoir de «dépasser, ou même équivalente, le pouvoir des États-Unis». Dans une rupture avec le Bush I et les administrations Clinton, cependant, l’administration Bush II a intégré la logique de «anticipation violence’into US Grand strategy.27The 2002 Stratégie de sécurité nationale, des déclarations de politique et de hauts fonctionnaires de l’administration (y compris le Président George W. Bush lui-même) ont réservé à Washington le droit d’agir préventivement, préventif ou de réduire rivaux potentiels avant qu’ils ne deviennent effectives ones.28China l ‘émergence comme une grande puissance défi directement America’sglobal hégémonie. Grande stratégie américaine vise clairement à maintenir enfoncée China.While en reconnaissant que la Chine est une puissance régionale, Washington notablement ne pas admettre que la Chine ou l’autre est, ou peut légitimement aspirer à être, un grand avertissement power.29Discreetly difficile la Chine contre les États-Unis militairement, 2002 la Stratégie de sécurité nationale met en garde que Beijing, «Dans la poursuite de capacités militaires avancées qui peuvent menacer ses voisins dans la région Asie-Pacifique, la Chine suit une voie dépassée qui, en fin de compte, va entraver sa propre poursuite de grandeur nationale. Avec le temps, la Chine estiment que social et 26Ibid., Pp.12-13, 15. 27It est peut-être plus exact de dire que l’administration Bush II, contrairement à ses prédécesseurs, ouvertement intégré préemption et la guerre préventive des États-Unis en grande stratégie. L’administration Clinton a fait préparer à lancer une grève préventive de nouveau la Corée du Nord au cours de la 1994crisis causé par la découverte de Pyongyang du programme d’armement nucléaire. Voir Ashton B. Carter et William J. Perry, «Back to the Brink”, Washington Post, Octobre 20, 2002, p.B1. Dans la mesure où l’administration Bush I de la politique, en fait, a été alimentée par les préoccupations concernant le président irakien Saddam Hussein, pousser à acquérir des armes nucléaires et autres armes de destruction massive de capacités, de 1991 guerre du Golfe persique pourrait être considérée comme une guerre préventive. 28George W. Bush, «Allocution du Président en 2002 l’obtention du diplôme exercice des États-Unis Académie militaire, West Point, NY, Juin 1, 2002, http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2002/06print/20020601-3. html.The Bush II administration Stratégie de sécurité nationale (op.cit. p. 15) déclare que: «Les États-Unis depuis longtemps l’option d’actions préemptives pour contrer une menace suffisamment grave pour notre sécurité nationale. Plus grande est la menace, plus le risque est de l’inaction – et plus le cas pour prendre des mesures préventives pour nous défendre, même si des incertitudes demeurent quant au lieu et au moment de l’attaque ennemie. Pour prévenir ou empêcher de tels actes hostiles de nos adversaires, les États-Unis, si nécessaire, agir préventivement “. 29For exemple, le Secrétaire à la défense William Cohen décrit la Chine comme un asiatique power.William Cohen,” Bernard Brodie annuel de conférences, Université de la Californie , Los Angeles, Octobre 28, 1998 (site Web du Département de la défense).
————————————————– ——————————
Page 10
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE63political la liberté est la seule source de cette grandeur ‘.30 Nonobstant le point de vue de Beijing au contraire, la grande stratégie américaine rejette la notion que la Chine a une base légitime pour ce qui concerne la présence militaire américaine en Asie de l’Est comme une menace à son interests.31 Washington vise à encourager la Chine à devenir un “membre responsable de la communauté internationale» .32 «responsabilité», cependant, est défini comme étant la volonté de Pékin d’accepter la vision de Washington d’un order.33It international stable, c’est aussi la Chine de politique intérieure la libéralisation, et de son développement comme une zone de libre-économie de marché solidement ancrée à l’économie internationale. Comme l’administration Bush II en 2002 Stratégie de sécurité nationale déclare, «l’Amérique encourager la promotion de la démocratie et de l’ouverture économique» en Chine, “parce que ce sont les meilleures fondations pour la stabilité intérieure et l’ordre international» .34 En substance, donc, grand-américain stratégie exige la Chine à accepter UShegemony. La stratégie est silencieux, toutefois, sur ce que les États-Unis faire si Pékin refuse d’accepter l’Amérique pré-éminence. Sur ce point-en dépit du fait que l’accent mis sur la pré-préventive et de prévention utilisation de la puissance militaire a été le plus souvent débattu dans le cadre de la réponse des États-Unis à des groupes terroristes comme Al-Qaida et les Etats voyous comme l’Irak de Saddam Hussein-Bush II La stratégie de l’administration a des implications évidentes pour peercompetitors potentiel tels que China.WILL CHINE LIEU? Le sort des hégémons grands stratèges américains croire, pour paraphraser la Duchesse de Windsor, que les États-Unis ne peut jamais être trop riche, trop puissant ou trop bien armés. Et, à première vue, la réaction naturelle est de se demander: “ce qui ne va pas avec ça?” Après tout, si la politique internationale est de pouvoir et est-il alors ne devrait pas les États-Unis cherchent à amasser autant de pouvoir que possible ? Pourtant, bien qu’il mai semble contre-intuitive, il ya beaucoup d’éléments de preuve qui suggère qu’il est auto-30National stratégie de sécurité, op.cit., P. 27 31Department de la Défense, Les États-Unis stratégie de sécurité pour l’Est-région Asie-Pacifique 1998 (Washington DC, 1998 ) p.30. 32Ibid.33Clinton, «Observations sur Unis et la Chine des relations,” Cohen, “Bernard Brodie annuel de conférences,” Etats-Unis stratégie de sécurité pour l’Est-région Asie-Pacifique 1998. Comme conseiller à la sécurité nationale Berger dit: «Notre intérêt réside dans la protection de notre sécurité tout en encourageant la Chine à prendre les bonnes choices’-en particulier le choix d’allouer ses ressources au développement interne plutôt que de construire sa puissance militaire. Berger, “American Power”. 34National stratégie de sécurité, op.cit.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 11
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY64defeating pour un grand pouvoir de devenir trop puissant. Depuis les débuts du système international moderne, il ya eu des offres successifs pour l’hégémonie: par l’Empire des Habsbourg sous Charles V, l’Espagne au titre de Philip II, la France sous Louis XIV et Napoléon, et en Allemagne sous Hitler (et, par certains historiens diront si – le point est contesté sous-Wilhelm II). Chacun de ces candidats hégémoniques, à son tour, a été rejeté par une contre-équilibrage coalition d’États qui craignaient les conséquences pour leur sécurité si un candidat hégémonique réussi à mettre en place sa prédominance sur le système international. «Empires hégémoniques, ‘Henry Kissinger a fait remarquer,« presque automatiquement d’obtenir la résistance universelle, ce qui explique pourquoi tous ces claimantssooner ou tard épuisés eux-mêmes ».35 Il s’agit d’un pari assez sûr que les États-Unis ne sera pas en mesure d’échapper au sort des concurrents précédents pour l’hégémonie. Conformément à la historicalrecord, il faut s’attendre à voir la puissance américaine soit équilibré par l’émergence de nouvelles grandes puissances, et / ou la formation de contre-hégémoniques des alliances à l’encontre de la States.36For équilibrage de se produire, bien sûr, il doit y avoir d’autres acteurs dans le système international en mesure d’apporter la US militaire, économique, et des capacités technologiques. À ce jour, toutefois, aucune rivalto les États-Unis a vu le jour. Et certains grands stratèges US crois pas challengers vont surgir dans le futur, parce que l’Amérique économique et technologique plus de potentiel entre grandes puissances rivales est insurmountable.37Indeed, compte tenu de l’immense déséquilibre de pouvoir en faveur de l’Amérique, ‘rattrapage est difficile .’38Clearly, À court terme (la prochaine décennie) aucun État émergera comme America’s géopolitique par les pairs. Mais au cours des prochaines décennies un ou plusieurs concurrents par les pairs est lié à émerger. C’est là que la Chine arrive dans l’équation. Pourquoi de nouvelles grandes puissances Rise: les impératifs de l’émergence de la Chine Grande puissance émergence résultats de l’imbrication des effets différentiels de taux de croissance, l’anarchie, et d’équilibrage. Le processus d’une grande puissance apparition est beaucoup plus simple que cette terminologie peut sembler donner à entendre. Le terme «différentiel de taux de croissance» est le spécialiste de la façon d’énoncer un fait important: l’économique (et technologique et militaire) des Etats puissance croît à 35Henry A. Kissinger, “The Long Shadow of Vietnam, Newsweek, Mai 1, 2000, p. 50. 36For une explication détaillée de la partie théorique et empirique fondements de cet argument, voir Christopher Layne, «The Illusion unipolaires. Pourquoi de nouvelles grandes puissances va augmenter », International Security, Vol. 17, n o 4 (printemps 1993), pp.5-51. 37William C. Wohlforth, «la stabilité d’un monde unipolaire”, International Security, Vol. 24, n o 1 (été 1999), pp.4-41. 38Kenneth N. Waltz, «Globalization and American Power», The National Interest, n ° 59 (printemps 2000), p. 54.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 12
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE65differential, et non parallèle, les taux. Une comparaison des États-Unis et la Chine fournit un exemple concret. Depuis le milieu des années 1980 jusqu’à la fin des années 1990, l’économie chinoise a crû à un taux supérieur à 10 pour cent par an, alors que pour la plupart de cette période, l’Amérique l’économie a connu une croissance de 3-4 pour cent un taux annuel. En relativeterms, par conséquent, la Chine a été devient plus fort si les États-Unis est devenue en baisse. Les décideurs politiques chinois sont en effet sensibles à la puissance relative des questions et à la relation entre un état de force économique et sa politique strength.39China ‘s par rapport puissance économique est de plus en plus rapidement: phenomenaleconomic son taux de croissance depuis le début des années 1980 a, par certaines mesures, catapulté dans une position comme le monde la deuxième plus grande économie. Si elle peut continuer à soutenir ses proches-à deux chiffres en taux de croissance les premières décennies de ce siècle, il est prévu de dépasser les États-Unis comme le leader mondial de la Chine economy.40Itis de croissance explosive qui alimente son essor comme un grande puissance. La différence entre la croissance de la Chine et l’Amérique taux moyens que la répartition de puissance relative est en train de changer, et que la Chine émergera comme un challenger des États-Unis à l’hégémonie mondiale. Comme l’historien Paul Kennedy l’a montré, une fois de plus par rapport économique des changements annoncé l’apparition de nouvelles grandes puissances qui un jour ont un impact décisif sur l’ordre militaire territoriale ».41 différentiels de taux de croissance, cependant, ne sont qu’une partie de l’histoire. La nature du système international (sa «structure systémique») joue un rôle majeur dans le processus d’une grande puissance émergence. Dans un monde réaliste, les États qui ont le potentiel de devenir les grandes puissances ont de solides, axée sur la sécurité, «structurel» les incitations à le faire. Pour être en mesure de se protéger des autres, les États doivent d’acquérir le même genre de capacités que possèdent leurs concurrents. La nature concurrentielle de la politique internationale pousse les États à s’inspirer de la réussite des caractéristiques de leurs concurrents, en particulier dans les domaines de la doctrine militaire et de la technologie. Si d’autres ne le font et à élaborer des stratégies efficaces instruments de la concurrence, un État doit répondre en nature ou en subir les conséquences de la chute derrière. De ce point de vue, il faut s’attendre à ce que cruciales égards, les grandes puissances vont chercher et d’agir très semblables. Il est également à prévoir que cette «mêmeté effet ‘pousser les Etats qui sont potentiellement très 39See David Shambaugh,« Growing Strong: la Chine défi à la sécurité en Asie, “Survival 36 (été 1994), p. 44. Shambaugh note que les stratèges chinois ont été fortement influencé par Paul Kennedy, The Rise and Fall of Great Powers.40See par exemple Harry Harding, «A Chinese Colossus?” Journal of Strategic Studies 18, Septembre 1995, p.106. Harding estime que la Chine dépassera les États-Unis et le Japon comme le monde la plus grande économie de la vingt et unième siècle la deuxième décennie 41Paul Kennedy, The Rise and Fall of Great Powers: les mutations économiques et les conflits militaires de 1500 à 2000 (New York: Random House , 1987), p.xxii.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 13
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY66powers effectivement à devenir de grands pouvoirs, et d’acquérir toutes les capacités convoyeur de ce statut. Les États qui ne sont pas conformes à cet impératif en paieront le prix. Comme l’a noté réaliste observe Kenneth Waltz, «Dans une auto-système d’aide, la possession de la plupart mais pas toutes les capacités d’une grande puissance laisse un état vulnérable à d’autres qui ont les instruments que l’État n’a pas moindre» .42 Un autre facteur le processus d’une grande puissance émergence est la tendance des Etats à un «équilibre» contre d’autres qui sont trop fort ou trop menaçant. Equilibrage est le terme théoriciens utilisons pour décrire un aspect de commonsensical des Etats comportement. Quand un État se sent menacé parce que l’autre est trop puissant, il va essayer de compenser l’autre force (que ce soit par le renforcement de ses propres capacités militaires et / ou en acquérant des alliés). La raison États équilibre est de corriger une répartition inégale du pouvoir relatif sur la scène internationale system.The pression de l’équilibre est particulièrement forte dans un système unipolaire tel que celui qui est entré en vigueur existence avec l’effondrement de l’Union soviétique. L’expérience historique conduit à l’espoir que l’Amérique actuelle de l’hégémonie devrait générer la montée de contre-pouvoir sous la forme de nouvelles grandes puissances. Par définition, la répartition de puissance relative dans un système unipolaire est extrêmement déséquilibré. Par conséquent, dans un système unipolaire, les pressions structurelles onpotential grandes puissances (comme la Chine) afin d’accroître leurs capacités et devenir de grands pouvoirs doivent être écrasante. S’ils ne le font pas acquérir une grande puissance capacités, mai ils être exploités par l’hégémon. Bien sûr, un potentiel de grande puissance en quête de sécurité mai déclencher un dilemme classique de sécurité. La Chine une grande puissance émergence est fournie à titre indicatif. L’essor de la Chine à une grande puissance statut à long terme est une quasi-certitude, compte tenu de sa puissance et les capacités latentes. Mais l’essor de la Chine est susceptible de se produire plus tôt que plus tard, parce que dans un monde unipolaire Chine a de très fortes incitations à l’équilibre contre la puissance américaine. En ce sens, l’impulsion immédiate pour l’essor de la Chine est une réaction défensive à l’Amérique de position hégémonique. Dans le même temps, cependant, l’essor de la Chine a fait d’autres, dont les États-Unis, des appréhensions au sujet de leurs propres compétitions Chine security.Can militaire? La Chine d’aujourd’hui n’a pas les deux conditions préalables stratégiques des grandes puissances statut: capacités de projection de puissance et une haute technologie militaire. À l’heure actuelle, la Chine est incapable de projeter l’air et de la puissance navale suffisante pour appuyer ses revendications et la mer de Chine du Sud et, en dépit de son robuste politique à l’égard de Taipei, il pourrait 42Kenneth Waltz, «la structure émergente de politique internationale,« la sécurité internationale 19 ( Automne 1994), p. 21.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 14
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE67not envahir Taïwan aujourd’hui avec succès. En outre, la Chine reste loin derrière les États-Unis (et au Japon, ainsi) dans sa capacité de domaine high-tech des forces militaires. Il ne faut pas accepter les demandes extravagantes de certains analystes militaires qu’une «révolution» dans les affaires militaires est en cours pour réaliser que la technologie moderne a un rôle important dans la guerre. La guerre du Golfe persique, au Kosovo et la campagne contre l’Afghanistan a offert un aperçu dans le champ de bataille du futur, où des capteurs, des ordinateurs, de communications en temps réel, furtif plates-formes d’armement et munitions à guidage de précision domineront. Avant de pouvoir rivaliser militairement contre les États-Unis (ou une rearmed Japon), Chinafirst doit mettre en place un moderne aérospatiale et l’industrie avionique (qui il manque actuellement), et de développer les autres éléments d’infrastructure nécessaires pour soutenir un 21stcentury militaires (électronique, puces, fibre optique, la céramique et la robotique – pour n’en nommer que quelques-uns). Sur le long terme, la Chine est lié à viser la parité militaire avec les États-Unis. Pour sûr, il ya beaucoup de stratèges américains qui pensent que la Chine est trop loin derrière les États-Unis pour divertir espoir de jamais rattraper, et qui a également prétendre, comme Andrew Nathan et Robert Ross maintenir que, même en essayant de combler l’écart est inutile car une telle politique “risques stimuler ses voisins afin d’accélérer leur rythme de l’avance, potentiellement accroître plutôt que de réduire l’écart entre la Chine besoins en matière de sécurité et de ses capacités militaires.” Les arguments de ce genre reflètent une logique particulière et sont historiquement myope. Si ce raisonnement est correct, pas de nouvelles de fin de grande puissance jamais tenter de rattraper la grande puissance dominante dans le système. Pourtant, pour tous les reasonsalready discuté, retardataires essaient (et parfois réussir) pour contester le système de power.43One dominante peut difficilement imaginer, par exemple, l’allemand ou les décideurs politiques américains à la fin du XIXe siècle en disant: “Oh bien, nous pouvons jamais l’espoir de faire correspondre la Grande-Bretagne stratégique, et nous serons moins en sécurité si nous essayons, que nous faudra, tout simplement, d’accepter que l’Angleterre la suprématie est un fait permanent géopolitique de la vie. “nous ne devrions pas non plus imaginer que la Chine comme une grande puissance serait contenu à accepter la domination politique des États-Unis et la supériorité militaire et si elle l’a fait, dans ce sens sens pourrait-on même parler de la Chine comme étant une grande puissance? La question de savoir si la Chine peut égalité, ou dépassent, les États-Unis dans l’efficacité militaire et la capacité est liée à, mais distincte de l’analyse, Nathan 43Andrew et Robert Ross, La Grande Muraille et la forteresse vide: la Chine de recherche pour la sécurité (New York: WW Norton and Company, 1997). Il est une importante documentation démontrant que les retardataires profiter des avantages de retard. “L’ouvrage isAlexander Gerschenkron, les avantages du retard économique dans une perspective historique (Cambridge, MA.: Belknap Press, 1962).
————————————————– ——————————
Page 15
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY
68the question de savoir si la Chine va atteindre une grande puissance debout. Grande-PowerSTATUS est un seuil qui, lorsqu’il a franchi, cela signifierait que la Chine possède (au moins dans une large mesure) les biens corporels les apports de ressources (en termes de finances, une base industrielle de défense, de technologies et de personnel qualifié) nécessaires pour un domaine la force militaire capable de rivaliser contre les States.However-Unis, en fait de savoir si la Chine serait en mesure d’utiliser ces resourceseffectively est une autre question. Comme les historiens militaires Allan R. Millett, Williamson Murray, et Kenneth Watman l’ont fait remarquer, «l’efficacité militaire est le processus par lequel les forces armées convertir les ressources en lutte contre le pouvoir.’44Hence La question clé est de savoir si la Chine peut convertir ses ressources en efficace et capable militaire puissance. Bien que beaucoup ait été écrit sur les questions liées militaire de l’innovation, l’efficacité et la compétence, nous comprenons encore qu’imparfaitement leurs causes sous-jacentes. Pourquoi certains militaires novatrices et d’autres pas? Pourquoi certains militaires efficaces et compétentes et d’autres pas? En outre, au-delà de la compréhension du lien de causalité, il ya la question de l’identification des repères. Quels sont les facteurs qui devons-nous chercher à déterminer si un militaire est susceptible d’être novatrices, efficaces, compétents? Analystes ont utilisé trois méthodes d’analyse des réponses à ces questions: la société, d’organisation et de réaliste. La perspective sociétale (qui se concentre sur la manière dont la cohésion, ou la division, de la société influe sur l’efficacité militaire) et la théorie organisationnelle de vue (qui identifie un certain nombre de pathologies qui font qu’il est difficile pour les organisations d’innover de manière efficace) ont des incidences ambiguë à l’égard de la question de savoir si la Chine sera en mesure d’innover avec succès dans le domaine militaire. La perspective réaliste, cependant, suggère fortement que la Chine, au fil du temps, sera en mesure de fermer les militaires actuellement écart la séparant de la States.States imiter leurs concurrents, en particulier militaire. Comme ColinElman politique scientifique a fait remarquer, peut-être plus que dans tout autre domaine, des technologies militaires, les stratégies et les institutions sont adoptées parce que la perception de ce que d’autres États sont l’action ».45 sécurité Barry Posen d’experts a identifié les facteurs externes qui en corrélation avec un état ‘S dans l’innovation, le succès militaire: la perception d’une menace à l’échelle internationale environnement, et révisionnistes 44Allan R. Millett, Williamson Murray, et Kenneth Watman, «L’efficacité des organisations militaires,” dans l’efficacité militaire, tome I: La Première Guerre mondiale, ed. Allan R. Millett et Williamson Murray (Boston: Unwin et Hyman, 1987), p.2.45Colin Elman, ‘Ne Unto les autres comme ils veulent te? Les composantes internes et externes déterminants de pratiques militaires »(Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, Harvard University, document non publié, Mai 1996), p. 3.

faibles pouvoirs vais essayer de développer des méthodes de lutte contre la guerre-qui neutralisent les avantages (matériels et / ou qualitatifs) dont bénéficie un adversaire plus fort. Sur le plan opérationnel et tactique, réactions asymétriques par d’autres à un hégémon mai se manifester dans la plus faible puissance choix de systèmes d’armes, la doctrine opérationnelle et tactique. Bien sûr, rien ne novelabout réactions asymétriques, qui sont aussi vieux que la guerre elle-même. Si ses stratèges sont intelligents, une plus faible puissance dans un concours asymétrique ne tentera pas de limace il avec un ennemi plus fort. Edward Luttwak Comme l’a noté, l’essence de la stratégie a toujours été la capacité d’identifier et d’exploiter, de l’opposant politique, opérationnel et tactique vulnerabilities.49Short de l’utilisation des armes nucléaires, biologiques, chimiques ou d’armes, un État comme la Chine qui, éventuellement, s’efforce, mais n’a pas encore atteint, une grande puissance statut peut utiliser d’autres moyens asymétriques pour compenser US capabilities.50Forexample supérieure, parce que les forces américaines dépendent de façon significative fondant sur les installations fournies par les alliés dans des régions clés, un adversaire plus faible comme la Chine pourrait utiliser balistiques missiles, et / ou des forces d’opérations spéciales de nier les États-Unis l’accès à ces installations en cas de conflit, ou au moins perturber US deployments.51Similarly vigueur, bien que pas en mesure de répondre aux États-Unis dans les principaux avant-garde des technologies militaires (commandement, contrôle , Les communications en temps réel de reconnaissance et de surveillance), une nouvelle que la Chine est encore un non-peer concurrent pourrait acquérir à faible coût les technologies de l’information-capacités de guerre qui pourraient désactiver les satellites et les ordinateurs sur lesquels l’armée américaine dépend de sa supériorité champ de bataille . En somme, même si, dans le court terme, d’autres n’ont pas la capacité de «équilibre» contre l’hégémonie américaine dans le sens traditionnel du terme, le seul fait de la prépondérance des États-Unis givesthem de fortes incitations à élaborer des stratégies, des armes, et à des doctrines que willenable à compenser les capacités d’Amérique . En effet, c’est exactement ce que Beijing semble être en train de faire. Impossible encore à parcourir à pieds-pieds avec les États-Unis dans un limitera le plus fort pouvoir d’encourir des coûts élevés pour les plus faibles défaite pouvoir. Voir Andrew Mack, “Pourquoi des Nations Big Lose Small Wars: La politique des conflits asymétriques», World Politics, Vol. 27 (Janvier 1975), pp.175-200. 49Edward Luttwak, Stratégie: la logique de la guerre et la paix (Cambridge, Mass: Belknap Le Pressof Harvard University Press, 1987), p. 16. 50For une analyse de la manière dont la Chine qui a échoué à atteindre par les pairs concurrent statut pourrait néanmoins l’emporter (ou l’impression que cela pourrait l’emporter) dans un conflit asymétrique avec les États-Unis ont combattu sur le sort de Taïwan, voir Thomas Christensen, «posent des problèmes sans Catching Up : L’essor de la Chine et les défis pour la politique de sécurité américaine », la sécurité internationale (printemps 2001) .51 Pour un débat sur la possible utilisation asymétrique de balistiques et les missiles de croisière à entraver l’utilisabilité de projection de puissance en Asie de l’Est, voir J. Paul Bracken, Fire à l’Est: l’avènement de la puissance militaire d’Asie et le deuxième Nuclear Age (New York: Harper Collins, 1999).
————————————————– ——————————
Page 18
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE71great puissance guerre, la Chine est de concentrer ses forces militaires accumulation sur les types de capacités de la force aérienne, les navires de croisière et les missiles balistiques, des sous-marins diesel-elle devrait l’emporter dans un bras de fer avec les États-Unis Taiwan.52In plus long terme, le fait même de US prépondérance mondiale est certainement l’émergence de spurChina comme un véritable concurrent par les pairs. AVEC AVEC UNE NOUVELLES CHINE: AMERICAN STRATEGYAs suggère la théorie réaliste, les problèmes de sécurité sont de conduire la Chine economicmodernization. Les dirigeants chinois comprennent le dilemme de sécurité (qui est, aussi longtemps que la Chine est faible, il est vulnérable aux États-Unis) et de tenir essentiellement une conception réaliste de la politique internationale. Beijing un point de vue américain-monde unipolaire dominé par nature comme en danger. La Chine est donc engagé à “équilibrer” contre la puissance américaine prépondérant (par le renforcement de ses propres capacités) et favorise un système multipolaire (c’est un système où il ya plus d’une seule grande puissance) dans lequel l’influence des États-Unis serait réduite. L’expérience historique montre que l’émergence de nouvelles grandes puissances a généralement un effet déstabilisateur sur la politique internationale. Ou, en anglais, le conflit est plus probable au cours des époques où les nouvelles grandes puissances émergentes, car il est très difficile de concilier les intérêts des risingnew grande puissance et l’ordre établi, le statut quo, les grandes puissances (ou, dans le contexte actuel monde, la seule et unique grande puissance). Que ce soit l’essor de la Chine à une grande puissance statut de perturbateur est, bien sûr, une des questions cruciales doivent répondre les analystes qui tentent de pairs dans l’avenir. Grande stratégie américaine abrite l’espoir que l’interdépendance économique et domestiques politicalliberalization va apprivoiser la Chine afin que ses grandes puissances émergence peuvent être logés et pacifiquement. Mais ces espoirs sont liés à une illusion. L’interdépendance économique dans la politique américaine cercles, un argument souvent entendu est que la Chine becomesincreasingly liée à l’économie internationale, de son interdépendance avec d’autres limitera de prendre des mesures politiques qui pourraient perturber son lien vital aux marchés étrangers et des capitaux, et à la haute technologie importsfrom les États-Unis, le Japon et l’Europe occidentale. Cette demande a été formulée à maintes reprises par l’administration Clinton et ses partisans dans le débat quant à savoir si les États-Unis devraient étendre permanente des relations commerciales normales à 52Craig S. Smith, «la Chine remodelage militaire de durcir ses musculaire dans la région,« New York Times, Octobre 16, 2002.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 19
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY72China, et de soutenir l’adhésion de Pékin à l’Organisation mondiale du commerce. «Interdépendance» est une autre façon de dire que le commerce est un lien qui lie statesto suivre pacifique, de coopération politique étrangère. Pourquoi ce devrait être le cas (ou, comme disent les politologues, ce qui est la «logique de cause à effet ‘qui sous-tend cette proposition)? En d’autres termes, qu’est-ce que c’est spécifiquement sur l’interdépendance que les causes prétendument la paix? Plusieurs logiques de causalité sous-tendent l’interdépendance conduit à peace’argument. La première est que, leur prospérité vient à être de plus en plus étroitement liée à l’économie mondiale, les États ne peuvent tout simplement pas se permettre l’interruption du commerce qui aurait pour conséquence de la guerre. Une autre est la demande que, dans la technologie d’aujourd’hui et de l’information axée sur l’économie mondiale, le commerce, pas la conquête, est la plus efficace voie de la réalisation de la richesse nationale. De nombreux décideurs politiques américains souscrivent fortement à la conviction que la Chine sera un acteur de coopération dans le internationalsystem parce que sa modernisation économique exige son intégration dans l’économie mondiale et, comme il devient de plus en plus interdépendant avec le monde extérieur, il se trouve que l’interdépendance a créé un site web interestswith d’Etats qui, autrement, pourraient être des rivaux géopolitiques. L’interdépendance conduit à la paix “argument, cependant, est par nature suspecte. Après tout, l’Europe n’a jamais été plus interdépendant (économiquement et intellectuellement et culturellement, ainsi) qu’elle ne l’était à la veille de la Première Guerre mondiale. De toute évidence, la perspective de renoncer à des avantages économiques du commerce n’a pas empêché l’Europe de grandes puissances de la lutte contre une longue et dévastatrice guerre. Implicite dans l’interdépendance conduit à la paix “argument est que la notion d’État pensent comme les comptables, mais ils ne le font pas. Les calculs économiques possibles de gain ou de perte sont rarement le facteur déterminant pour policymakersdecide sur la guerre ou la paix. Et même s’ils l’étaient, il ya peu de raisons de croire que l’interdépendance économique serait un moyen de dissuasion à la guerre. La raison en est que même pour les perdants, les conséquences économiques négatives moderne de grande puissance guerres ont été de courte durée. La Chine a fait récemment conduite suggère en outre les raisons d’être sceptiques de l’interdépendance conduit à la paix “argument: Beijing n’agit pas comme prédit par la théorie. En politique scientifique Gerald Segal a souligné, le comportement de la Chine dans le détroit de Taiwan et la mer de Chine du Sud dans les années 1990 indique qu’il n’est pas limitée par la crainte que sa politique étrangère musculaire aura une incidence négative sur l’outre-mer trade.53As Chine devient de plus en plus puissants, il apparaît de plus en plus prêts à risquer les coûts à court terme de ses intérêts dans l’interdépendance économique dans 53Gerald Segal, ‘Les’ Constrainment “de la Chine,» International Security, Vol. 20 (printemps 1996), pp.107-35.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 20
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE73order à poursuivre ses intérêts géostratégiques. En effet, que la Chine devient plus riches et plus forts militairement, il est (comme la théorie réaliste de prévoir) devient moreassertive dans son comportement externe. La paix démocratique soi-disant théorie de la paix démocratique est également invoquées à l’appui de la thèse selon laquelle l’imminence d’un sino-américain rivalité peut être ameliorated.Among les stratèges américains qui ont pris une ligne dure sur la Chine, l’opinion s’est emparé de ce conflit avec la Chine est – inévitable à moins que la Chine devient une démocratie. C’est en partie parce que la Chine ambitions extérieures sont considérées comme étant en conflit avec les intérêts de l’Amérique. Toutefois, la Chine «agressivité» est attribuée par les États-Unis la ligne dure, dans une large mesure, à la nature de son système politique intérieure. En termes simples, les conteneurs vue la Chine comme un «mauvais» état. Ce point de vue wilsonien est typiquement américain. Le temps testé-américain pour remédier à un “mauvais” est de le transformer en un «bon état, c’est-à-dans une démocratie. Le wilsonien intègre les perspectives soi-disant «théorie de la paix démocratique», qui affirme que les démocraties ne vont jamais à la guerre avec d’autres démocraties. Par conséquent, élargir la “zone démocratique de la paix” isdeemed un élément essentiel de sécurité américains. Pourtant, la théorie démocratique, la paix est singulièrement dépourvue de merit.54There intellectuelle sont deux (non mutuellement exclusives) de causalité explications de la paix démocratique: en premier lieu, dans les démocraties, d’Etat sont retenus d’aller faire la guerre par le public, sur laquelle les coûts humains et économiques chute de la guerre, et d’autre part, dans leurs relations extérieures avec un autre, les États démocratiques sont régies par les mêmes normes de règlement pacifique des différends qui s’appliquent à leur politique intérieure. Ni la logique de causalité détient en vertu de contrôle. Les démocraties ont souvent été à la guerre avec enthousiasme (Grande-Bretagne et la France en 1914, les États-Unis en 1898). Et il est un grand record historique démontre que, lorsque des intérêts nationaux vitaux sont en jeu, les Etats démocratiques ont systématiquement pratiqué grand-bâton, la realpolitik diplomatie contre d’autres démocraties (y compris les menaces de recourir à la force). En outre, contrairement à la paix démocratique par la théorie de la centrale principe, les États démocratiques sont allés à la guerre les uns avec les other.55It importe peu, cependant, si la paix démocratique théorie est vraie. Ce qui importe, c’est que la plupart de la politique étrangère américaine communauté estime qu’il est vrai. Et cette conviction a des conséquences. Après tout, si un État nondemocratic (54For dans une critique de la théorie démocratique, la paix, voir Christopher Layne, «Kant ou Cant: Ils mythe de la paix démocratique», la sécurité internationale (Automne 1994). 55See Christopher Layne, «Jeux Shell, Shallow gains et la paix démocratique », Revue d’histoire internationale (Décembre 2001).
————————————————– ——————————
Page 21
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY74this cas, de la Chine) est susceptible d’être un problème et un défi fabricant États-Unis, la solution évidente à ce problème est pour les États-Unis à cause de cet état se métamorphoser en une démocratie: «L’ultime Américain sur la Chine objectif est d’amener la Chine à adopter un comportement plus responsable et à devenir moredemocratic. “L’impulsion à être un” Etat croisé “, cependant, a toujours poussé les États-Unis sur la voie de la politique étrangère mésaventure, et le faire si Washington wilsonien pousse son ordre du jour sur Beijing. Éviter sino-américain des conflits
I: Évitez le piège de wilsonien une perspective réaliste, on doit conclure que les Etats-Unis, Chine une grande puissance la concurrence est très probable dans l’avenir. La rivalité entre grandes puissances est la norme dans la politique internationale pour plusieurs raisons: l’anarchie entre les Etats génère des craintes légitimes en matière de sécurité qui nécessitent et justifient d’auto-assistance; raison d’État prédominent par rapport aux relations interpersonnelles des normes de comportement et les relations de pouvoir l’emportent sur les politiques internes pour déterminer les caractéristiques État comportement. Mais si la rivalité est certaine, la guerre ne l’est pas. En effet, la paix mai être la cause la plus surdéterminée phénomène dans la politique internationale. À cet égard, le réalisme est une théorie sur la guerre et la paix. En raison de l’anarchie, l’auto-assistance nature de la politique internationale, réalistes pense que les guerres peuvent survenir et parfois do.At le même temps, de nombreux réalistes font valoir (comme le ferait I) que la guerre, en particulier les grandes puissances de guerre, est rare. La raison en est que pour les grandes puissances, la guerre elle-même est un moyen de dissuasion, mais un imparfait. En raison des incertitudes qu’elle comporte, la décision de partir à la guerre est toujours (comme le chancelier Bethmann-Hollweg a dit en 1914) “un saut dans l’obscurité.” Pour cette raison, réalistes s’attendrait plus grandes puissances crises à résoudre à court de la guerre. En effet, parce que la guerre est telle un risque d’affaires et incertain, réalistes États s’attendrait à être extrêmement prudent dans la marche à la guerre. Si les États-Unis et la Chine se trouvent sur le bord de la guerre dans l’avenir sera déterminé autant par Washington que par les politiques de Beijing. Il ya deux éléments de sa grande stratégie vers la Chine que Washington doit revoir, et ils sont liés: le commerce et la libéralisation intérieure. Le commerce est une question où presque toutes les parties dans le débat actuel sur l’Amérique politique de la Chine ont eu tort. L’engagement (fondée sur l’interdépendance économique et de libre-échange) ni contraindre la Chine à se comporter de façon responsable »ni conduire à une évolution de transformation de la Chine à l’intérieur du système (certainement pas de toute politique pertinente laps de temps). Sans entrave le libre-échange, cependant, tout simplement accélérer le rythme de la Chine une grande puissance émergence: la Chine devient plus liée à l’économie mondiale, plus rapidement il est en mesure de se développer à la fois absolue et relative du pouvoir économique. Être
————————————————– ——————————
Page 22
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE75sure, court de la guerre préventive, rien ne les États-Unis peuvent faire pour empêcher la Chine de devenir à terme une grande puissance. Ainsi, il serait inutile de simplement cesser les relations économiques avec la Chine. Mais les États-Unis doivent être prudents sur la manière dont-et pourquoi-il commerce avec Pékin. Commercial américain avec la Chine devrait être guidé par stratégique, pas marché, la prise en compte. Si Washington peut pas empêcher l’essor de la Chine à une grande puissance statut, il possède néanmoins un certain contrôle sur le rythme de la Chine une grande puissance émergence. Une politique commerciale des États-Unis qui permet d’accélérer ce processus est à courte vue et contrairement à l’Amérique intérêts stratégiques. Les États-Unis devraient viser à réduire la Chine à l’exportation de l’excédent à la priver de devises fortes réserves que Beijing va utiliser pour l’importation de haute technologie (qui lui servira à moderniser son armée). Washington devrait aussi réglementer strictement la sortie directe de critique des technologies de pointe des Etats-Unis à la Chine sous forme de licences, offset, ou joint-venture. Individuel mai sociétés ont un intérêt à pénétrer le marché chinois, mais il n’ya pas de l’intérêt américain, par exemple, en autorisant les entreprises américaines à faciliter le développement de la Chine d’un titre de l’industrie aérospatiale. D’autre part, les États-Unis la ligne dure qui veulent utiliser sino-américain du commerce un gourdin pour obliger Pékin à accepter l’Amérique impose en ce qui concerne les droits de l’homme et la démocratisation ont également se sont trompés: alors que l’Amérique de levier est trop limité pour avez des effets positifs significatifs, Washington tente de transformer la Chine va enflammer l’échelle nationale Sino-American relations. Américain tente de l ‘ «exportation» la démocratie en Chine sont particulièrement à court terme et dangereuse. America’s valeurs ne sont pas universellement accepté comme un modèle à suivre, surtout par la Chine. En outre, l’Amérique tente d’universaliser ses valeurs libérales et les institutions sont plus susceptibles d’être considérée par d’autres comme un exercice de la puissance hégémonique plutôt que comme un acte d’altruisme désintéressé. En effet, il est courant d’observer que les États-Unis invoque ses valeurs comme un moyen de légitimer son rôle prédominant dans la politique internationale. Comme le politologue Samuel P. Huntington a fait remarquer, une politique américaine fondée sur l’applicabilité universelle de l’idéologie libérale et démocratique est la «idéologie de l’Ouest pour l’affrontement avec les cultures non occidentales» .56 efforts américains pour forcer la Chine à se conformer aux normes et d’Amérique valeurs, en fait, ont aiguisé sino-américaines tensions. Le Président chinois Jiang 56Samuel P. Huntington, Le choc des civilisations et la Remaking of World Order (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996), p.66.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 23
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY76Zemin de remarques Octobre 1995 au Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies sont des exemples. Dans son discours, il a fait observer que «certaines grandes puissances, souvent sous le couvert de la liberté, la démocratie et les droits de l’homme, énoncés à empiéter sur la souveraineté d’autres pays, s’ingérer dans leurs affaires intérieures et de saper leur unité nationale et l’harmonie ethnique”. 57The tentative d’exporter la démocratie entraînera une réaction géopolitique Chine en renforçant la résolution de résister à l’hégémonie américaine. Kenneth Waltz perceptif observe pourquoi il en est ainsi: Le puissant mai, et les États-Unis, pensez à lui-même asacting en faveur de la paix, de justice et de bien-être dans le monde. Mais ces termes seront définis au gré des puissants, qui mai conflit avec les préférences et les intérêts des autres. Dans la politique internationale, repousse puissance et conduit les autres à essayer d’équilibrer son encontre. Avec l’intention bénigne, les États-Unis hasbehaved, et jusqu’à ce que son pouvoir est mis en un semblant d’équilibre, continuera à se comporter d’une manière qui gênent et menacent others.58The la vérité est que la Chine ne va pas devenir une démocratie certainement pas tout moment bientôt et les États-Unis n’a pas le pouvoir de contraindre la Chine à transformer son système politique intérieure. Les efforts menés pour ce faire peuvent uniquement servir à aviver les tensions entre Washington et Beijing. Les dirigeants chinois craignent, et de s’opposer, l’hégémonie américaine, et qu’ils considèrent l’Amérique tente d’imposer sa politique et culturalvalues sur la Chine comme une manifestation spécifique de l’Amérique “l’hégémonisme». Éviter sino-américain des conflits II: Taïwan Taïwan est une poudre fût question. La Chine reste attachée à nationalreunification, Taiwan est encore sensiblement en mouvement vers l’indépendance. Presque certainement, Pékin taïwanais ce qui concerne une déclaration d’indépendance, comme un casus belli. Il est difficile de savoir comment les États-Unis face à une Chine-Taïwan conflit, bien que le Président George W. Bush a créé une sensation en 2001 lorsqu’il a déclaré les États-Unis d’intervenir militairement dans le cas d’une attaque chinoise sur Taïwan. Pour sûr, toutefois, il est prudent de prévoir qu’il y aurait une forte pression politique interne en faveur de l’intervention américaine. Beyondthe arguments que l’action militaire chinoise contre Taïwan compromettrait les intérêts américains dans un ordre mondial stable et constituent inacceptable “agression”, idéologique antipathie envers la Chine et le soutien à une démocratisation de Taïwan serait puissante incitation à l’intervention américaine. 57Quoted dans Alison Mitchell, “Meager progrès que la Chine et chef Rencontrez Clinton,” New York Times, Octobre 25, 1995. 58Kenneth Waltz, «l’Amérique un modèle pour le monde? Une politique étrangère, «PS (Décembre 1991), p.669.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 24
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE77American stratèges avance trois raisons pour lesquelles les États-Unis devraient défendre Taïwan: stratégique; réputation et idéologique. Stratégiquement, de Taïwan doit être défendu pour protéger les routes commerciales dans la mer de Chine méridionale. Que sur cet argument, cependant, est que ces routes maritimes sont d’une importance vitale japonais intérêt, mais sont relativement peu importantes pour que les États-Unis. La réputation argument est que si les États-Unis défend Taiwan de Chine, d’autres États vont perdre la confiance dans l’Amérique des garanties de sécurité et acquiescer à la Chine l’hégémonie régionale. Cet argument sur deux points: premièrement, une fois que la Chine devient une grande puissance, la crédibilité des engagements des États-Unis en Asie de l’Est va inévitablement diminuer et, d’autre part, quel que soit les États-Unis à l’égard de Taïwan, d’autres Etats d’Asie de l’Est pour équilibrer le contre d’une menace à la Chine dans l’auto-défense, plutôt que de sauter sur son mouvement. L’argument idéologique, nous l’avons déjà mentionné, est que les États-Unis ne peuvent pas se permettre de se tenir debout sur la touche tandis que les autres une démocratie est conquis par une grande puissance autoritaire. Au cours de 1996 les tensions entre Taiwan et la Chine, des membres influents de la politique étrangère communautaire a fait valoir que les intérêts américains bénéficient de l’appui nécessaire pour Taïwan parce que la véritable question en jeu était la nécessité de défendre un Etat démocratique menacé par un totalitarisme. Un chef de file dans les affaires d’Asie expert a fait valoir, par exemple, que la question entre la Chine et de Taïwan n’a rien à voir avec son statut politique comme une province de Chine continentale. Au contraire, il a été allégué, les États-Unis ont un intérêt dans la défense de Taiwan et la préservation de la démocratie comme un modèle politique pour Pékin d’adopter (sans doute parce que une Chine démocratique, d’un américain, serait un plus souples État): Les Nations Les États doivent reconnaître qu’il a un intérêt fondamental dans la promotion de la démocratie chinois, et à protéger sa seul exemple de Taïwan. Ainsi, nous devons mettre en garde la Chine en termes très clairs que nous n’allons pas rester les bras croisés si la démocratie de Taiwan est menacée, encourageour alliés à faire des déclarations similaires, et continuer à appuyer nos paroles par un spectacle de power.59Arguments navale américaine que les États-Unis doivent être prêts à défendre Taïwan invasion du chinois sur trois points. Tout d’abord, pour près d’un quart de siècle, les États-Unis a reconnu que Taiwan est une province chinoise, pas un État indépendant. Deuxièmement, l’Amérique du européenne et les alliés asiatiques n’ont aucun intérêt à choisir une querelle avec la Chine sur Taiwan son destin. Si Washington va au tapis avec la Chine sur Taiwan, il sera presque certainement le faire seules. (Compte tenu de son unilatéraliste plié, cependant, la perspective de la lutte contre la Chine sans 59Christopher Sigur J., «Pourquoi la Chine Taïwan Soares,” New York Times, Mars 19, 1996.
————————————————– ——————————
Page 25
Le rôle de la Chine dans l’american GRAND STRATEGY78allies pourrait ne pas être d’une grande préoccupation pour l’administration Bush II.) En troisième lieu, par la défense de Taïwan, les États-Unis risque de confrontation armée avec China.In court terme, une invasion chinoise de Taiwan est peu probable, et les États-Unis ont peu à craindre d’un affrontement militaire avec la Chine. Ces deux conditions, cependant, sont susceptibles d’évoluer au cours des prochaines années. En descendant la route une décennie ou deux, il serait géopolitique un acte de folie pour les États-Unis risque de guerre avec la Chine en vue de la défense de la démocratie à Taiwan. La question en jeu n’aurait tout simplement pas justifier les risques et les coûts de le faire. En effet, quelle que soit la raison invoquée, l’affirmation selon laquelle les États-Unis devraient risque de conflit d’empêcher Pékin de recourir à la force pour réaliser la réunification avec Taïwan s’élève à rien de plus qu’une voilée argument en faveur d’une baisse de l’Amérique à une lutte “préventive” guerre contre une hausse Chine. Ici, l’étreinte de pré-préventive et de prévention stratégies militaires par l’administration Bush II soulève des questions évidentes. Si US ligne dure crois que la guerre préventive est une option viable pour faire face à une augmentation Chine, au lieu d’utiliser la question de Taiwan comme une feuille de figuier, ils devraient le dire publiquement, afin que le bien-fondé de cette stratégie peut être débattu.
CONCLUSION: VERS UNE STRATÉGIE équilibrage offshore en Asie de l’Est? Toute sa valeur réaliste sel d’accord pour dire que la montée d’une nouvelle grande puissance isreason de préoccupation. Toutefois, si préoccupation est prudent, la panique ne l’est pas. La Chine est en train d’émerger comme une grande puissance. Mais il a une distance considérable à parcourir avant, il est donc et il est concevable (même s’il n’est pas probable) de ne pas y arriver. La capacité de la Chine à atteindre une grande puissance statut repose essentiellement sur deux considérations: la croissance économique et la situation politique intérieure. Sur le premier point, la Chine n’a besoin que de croître à un sept à huit pour cent le taux annuel au cours des prochains dix à vingt ans pour dépasser les États-Unis comme le monde la plus grande économie. Toutes choses étant égales par ailleurs, ces taux de croissance semble possible, même probable. Cependant, toutes choses ne sont pas égaux, ce qui conduit à une deuxième série de considérations qui se rapportent à la Chine de cohésion interne. Il a été beaucoup plus la spéculation que la Chine de route à grande puissance statut mai échouent à cause d’évolutions internes domestiques. Les troubles civils résultant de la libéralisation politique n’a pas, ou l’effet centrifuge de saper l’autonomie régionale du gouvernement central de contrôle de la nation est le plus fréquemment mentionné les menaces internes à la Chine une grande puissance émergence. Bien que ces possibilités ne peut être écartée, il semble néanmoins que la Chine est peu probable soit de succomber à un bouleversement politique intérieure ou le type de
————————————————– ——————————
Page 26
CHRISTOPHER LAYNE79disintegration qui pourraient conduire à un effondrement de l’autorité du gouvernement central. Ainsi, l’essor de la Chine à une grande puissance statut ne sera probablement pas détournée par l’évolution politique interne. Que faut-il les États-Unis sur la Chine? Si les États-Unis persiste dans sa stratégie hégémonique grand, plus tôt ou plus tard, les chances d’un sino-américain des conflits sont assez élevés. Actuelle stratégie américaine ainsi commitsthe États-Unis à maintenir le statu quo géopolitique en Asie de l’Est, un statu quo qui reflète l’Amérique du pouvoir hégémonique et les intérêts. Amérique dans l’intérêt de préserver le statu quo, toutefois, est tenu de choc avec les ambitions de l’augmentation de la Chine. Comme une grande puissance, la Chine ne fait aucun doute qu’il a ses propres idées sur la façon dont l’Asie de l’Est et de la sécurité politique ordre beorganized. États-Unis et à moins que les intérêts chinois peut être satisfaite, le potentiel de tension ou pour le pire-existe. En outre, le fait même de l’hégémonie américaine, comme je l’ai expliqué, est tenu de produire une geopoliticalbacklash-avec la Chine dans l’avant-garde en la forme de contre-hégémoniques équilibrage. Dans le même temps, les États-Unis ne peut être complètement indifférent à l’essor de la Chine, que ce soit. Les États-Unis pourrait accomplir les objectifs importants de contenir la Chine, tout en évitant tout conflit direct avec la Chine, en abandonnant sa grande stratégie hégémonique en faveur d’un large équilibre grande stratégie combinée avec un “sphères d’influence” diplomatie. Au cours de l’histoire grandes puissances ont été en mesure de tenir compte des uns et des autres conflits interestsdespite différences idéologiques et le fait que rarement ce qui concerne chaque otheras amis. Parmi international moderne histoire de grandes puissances, seuls les États-Unis semble pas en mesure d’accepter le fait que les grandes puissances doivent vivre dans un monde avec d’autres, qui n’ont ni comme eux, ni partager leurs valeurs. La croyance que l’Amérique doit universaliser ses institutions et valeurs afin d’être protégé a eu des conséquences terribles dans le passé. La question de Taiwan montre que cet état d’esprit mai conduire au désastre à l’avenir. L’élément clé d’une nouvelle approche géopolitique par le Stateswould offshore balancing.60Instead être d’essayer de mettre fin à l’émergence de nouvelles grandes puissances, un grand équilibre au large stratégie de reconnaître le caractère inévitable de leur émergence, et ce à tour l’avantage de l’Amérique. Plutôt que de craindre la multipolarité, de même que la présente stratégie américaine d’hégémonie, en mer d’équilibrage de l’adopter. Une telle stratégie d’équilibrage 60On offshore équilibrage, voir Christopher Layne, «De Prépondérance à Offshore Balancing: America’s Future Grand Strategy», International Security, Vol. 19 (été 1997). Pour une discussion sur la façon d’équilibrage en mer pourraient travailler en Asie de l’Est, voir Christopher Layne, «Less Is More», The National Interest, n ° 43 (printemps 1996).

———————————
http://209.85.135.104/search?q=cache:85cBF6dL-f8J:www.apcss.org/Publications/Edited%2520Volumes/RegionalFinal%2520chapters/Chapter5Layne.pdf+American+grand+strategies&hl=fr&ct=clnk&cd=11&gl=fr

www.apcss.org/Publications/Edited%20Volumes/RegionalFinal%20chapters/Chapter5Layne.pdf

http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2F209.85.135.104%2Fsearch%3Fq%3Dcache%3A85cBF6dL-f8J%3Awww.apcss.org%2FPublications%2FEdited%252520Volumes%2FRegionalFinal%252520chapters%2FChapter5Layne.pdf%2BAmerican%2Bgrand%2Bstrategies%26hl%3Dfr%26ct%3Dclnk%26cd%3D11%26gl%3Dfr&langpair=en%7Cfr&hl=fr&ie=UTF-8

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: